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Unprecedented
Unprecedented

Unprecedented

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Community, Access, and Library: ultraviolet-techno-ecology An awful lot of housing clutter relates directly to the lack of community resources for temporary usage of occasional-use tools and supplies. The average kitchen for example contains a lot of appliances which are only used for special occasions, and a sort of Kitchen-Library could easily supply the necessary tool:s as-needed to an entire community without cluttering up everyone's individual homes In other words - Not every household requires access to a power drill every single day, but an awfully large number of households have had to make permanent space for a power drill they bought specifically for those rare days when they have been needed vighnantaka-bard This is a thought I've had in the past as well, it can be extended to many other specialized tools and other items. Even though I tend towards Thoreau-esque self-relianceI think that the general concept of a library can and should be extended much farther. There's a lot of potential yet to be tapped It's not a new idea either, the Haudenosaunee, also known as the Iroquois Confederacy implemented this practice extensively through what we could loosely call in English, "guilds." There are also some Amish communities who have an informal system for borrowing and passing along various building tools Contrary to popular belief, Amish people don't shun all modern technology and many of them today use power tools, albeit ones that are offgrid and meet specific requirements. The trope of barn-raising Amish people isn't very accurate these days, but cooperation, anti-consumption, and humility are still deeply ingrained their worldview Time to clear out our housing clutter.
Community, Access, and Library: ultraviolet-techno-ecology
 An awful lot of housing clutter relates directly to the lack of community resources
 for temporary usage of occasional-use tools and supplies. The average kitchen
 for example contains a lot of appliances which are only used for special
 occasions, and a sort of Kitchen-Library could easily supply the necessary tool:s
 as-needed to an entire community without cluttering up everyone's individual
 homes
 In other words - Not every household requires access to a power drill every
 single day, but an awfully large number of households have had to make
 permanent space for a power drill they bought specifically for those rare days
 when they have been needed
 vighnantaka-bard
 This is a thought I've had in the past as well, it can be extended to many other
 specialized tools and other items. Even though I tend towards Thoreau-esque
 self-relianceI think that the general concept of a library can and should be
 extended much farther. There's a lot of potential yet to be tapped
 It's not a new idea either, the Haudenosaunee, also known as the Iroquois
 Confederacy implemented this practice extensively through what we could
 loosely call in English, "guilds." There are also some Amish communities who
 have an informal system for borrowing and passing along various building tools
 Contrary to popular belief, Amish people don't shun all modern technology and
 many of them today use power tools, albeit ones that are offgrid and meet
 specific requirements. The trope of barn-raising Amish people isn't very accurate
 these days, but cooperation, anti-consumption, and humility are still deeply
 ingrained their worldview
Time to clear out our housing clutter.

Time to clear out our housing clutter.

College, Dude, and Future: Every graduating senior is scared, to some degree, of the future, but this was on a different level. When my class left our liberal arts experience, we scattered to temporary gigs: I worked at a dude ranch; another friend nannied for the summer; one got a job on a farm in New Zealand; others became raft guides and transitioned to ski instructors. We didn't think our first job was important; it was just a job and would eventually, meanderingly lead to The Job. But these students were convinced that their first job out of college would not only determine their career trajectory, but also their intrinsic value for the rest of their lives. I told one student, whose dozens of internship and fellowship applications yielded no results, that she should move somewhere fun, get any job, and figure out what interests her and what kind of work she doesn't want to do - a suggestion that prompted wailing. "But what'll I tell my parents?" she said. "I want a cool job I'm passionate about!" Those expectations encapsulate the millennial rearing project, in which students internalize the need to find employment that reflects well on their parents (steady, decently paying, recognizable as a "good job") that's also impressive to their peers (at a "cool" company) and fulfills what they've been told has been the end goal of all of this childhood optimization: doing work that you're passionate about. Whether that job is as a professional sports player, a Patagonia social media manager, a programmer at a startup, or a partner at a law firm seems to matter less than checking all of those boxes. What's worse, the feeling of accomplishment that follows an exhausting task passing the final! Finishing the massive work project! - never comes. "The exhaustion experienced in burnout combines an intense yearning for this state of completion with the tormenting sense that it cannot be attained that there is always some demand or anxiety or distraction which can't be silenced," Josh Cohen, a psychoanalyst specializing in burnout, writes. "You josieandthepussycatsofficial: reading this article is like staring into a mirror https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/millennials-burnout-generation-debt-work
College, Dude, and Future: Every graduating senior is scared, to some degree, of the future, but this was
 on a different level. When my class left our liberal arts experience, we
 scattered to temporary gigs: I worked at a dude ranch; another friend
 nannied for the summer; one got a job on a farm in New Zealand; others
 became raft guides and transitioned to ski instructors. We didn't think our
 first job was important; it was just a job and would eventually, meanderingly
 lead to The Job.
 But these students were convinced that their first job out of college would not
 only determine their career trajectory, but also their intrinsic value for the
 rest of their lives. I told one student, whose dozens of internship and
 fellowship applications yielded no results, that she should move somewhere
 fun, get any job, and figure out what interests her and what kind of work she
 doesn't want to do - a suggestion that prompted wailing. "But what'll I tell
 my parents?" she said. "I want a cool job I'm passionate about!"

 Those expectations encapsulate the millennial rearing project, in which
 students internalize the need to find employment that reflects well on their
 parents (steady, decently paying, recognizable as a "good job") that's also
 impressive to their peers (at a "cool" company) and fulfills what they've been
 told has been the end goal of all of this childhood optimization: doing work
 that you're passionate about. Whether that job is as a professional sports
 player, a Patagonia social media manager, a programmer at a startup, or a
 partner at a law firm seems to matter less than checking all of those boxes.

 What's worse, the feeling of accomplishment that follows an exhausting task
 passing the final! Finishing the massive work project! - never comes. "The
 exhaustion experienced in burnout combines an intense yearning for this
 state of completion with the tormenting sense that it cannot be attained
 that there is always some demand or anxiety or distraction which can't be
 silenced," Josh Cohen, a psychoanalyst specializing in burnout, writes. "You
josieandthepussycatsofficial:

reading this article is like staring into a mirror
https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/millennials-burnout-generation-debt-work

josieandthepussycatsofficial: reading this article is like staring into a mirror https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/mil...