Meadow
Meadow

Meadow

Ã……Ã…‚
Ã……Ã…‚

Ã……Ã…‚

Cherries
Cherries

Cherries

Negative
Negative

Negative

Farm
Farm

Farm

at-work
at-work

at-work

shortness
 shortness

shortness

farms
 farms

farms

growing
 growing

growing

plants
 plants

plants

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Lit, Spider, and Vine: THE POCKET ENCY CLOPEDIA OF INDOOR PLANTS IN COLOR A. Nicolaisen urdy, have 10 erect trunk with site,shieland holes. From the stems, large Philodendron scander Growth: Vigorous clim while very small on en leaves on long ield-like leaves unches of hanging aerial roots are formed. Older plants may, under favour Sweetheart Vine able conditions in conservatories or Habitat: West Indies. hothouses, develop large, calla-like G inforescences with white spathes. Later, with pointed, heart-shap s with dots and pale yellow and pale ultivated as a young plant and en. C carded when the bottom leaves are d, its value as an ornamental plant i s debatable e: Best in a warm greenhouse, o good in a room after careful har ing off. Thrives for a time in dee g off. Thom after caou but aromatic edible fruits appear, which de. Requires a lot of space. 1S grow to lengths of 30 cr have a taste similar to that of a pine- specimens. New leave brown and almost trans Use: Decorative room plant, requiring a lot of space. Suitable for trellising to l: Soilless mixture or light leaf mould ding: 3 grams per litre (1 oz. per ter: Should be kept moist all the year ht: Never direct sunlight. Thrives in Use: Well suited as cli alls, doorways and large windows. Soil: Soilless mixture with added peat. pH Feeding: 3 gram gallon) every Fertiliser sh moist soil trellises or walls or as a plant, also as a ground rvatories. An amusin s to allow the pla enveloped in mois soil on) every week (March-October). nd. Will not stand drying out. dy rooms, halls or staircases. t: Poor growth if temperature falls w minimum 15° C. (60° F.) during er st attractive and amount in t ss mixture rams per Frequent spraying. especially in lit positions, the spots and edges. Heat: Normal room temp not less than 12° C. (55° F Air: Syringe during gro up to very good centrall he Re-potting: Every 3 orA years Propagation: By cuttig top shoots with the aerial roots atta hed. They should be planted in equal arts of soilless mi:x ее ai otting: Every spring, in spacious agation: By cuttings in a green in an enclosed atmosphere, with e Mealy bug, red spider mite ially when the growing point is ri it e and sand, and must be kept moist and warm Varieties: borsig ina (but correctly Monstera pertus, which has smaller eaves and mor aerial roots than the type, and grows ore rapidly and vigor- ously. Can al be used in smaller rooms. This is e variety illustrated. NOTE: Aerial pots, which--like ordin ary rootss ve as ducts for transmit The sap in the leaves and stems is nous varieties: There are many hybrids this and other species with a variation in the distribution of en rs in the leaves. See also below. enbachia leopoldii
Lit, Spider, and Vine: THE POCKET
 ENCY CLOPEDIA OF
 INDOOR PLANTS
 IN COLOR
 A. Nicolaisen

 urdy,
 have
 10
 erect trunk with
 site,shieland holes. From the stems, large Philodendron scander
 Growth: Vigorous clim
 while very small on
 en leaves on long
 ield-like leaves
 unches of hanging aerial roots are
 formed. Older plants may, under favour Sweetheart Vine
 able conditions in conservatories or Habitat: West Indies.
 hothouses, develop large, calla-like G
 inforescences with white spathes. Later, with pointed, heart-shap
 s with dots and
 pale yellow and pale
 ultivated as a young plant and
 en. C
 carded when the bottom leaves are
 d, its value as an ornamental plant i
 s debatable
 e: Best in a warm greenhouse,
 o good in a room after careful har
 ing off. Thrives for a time in dee
 g off. Thom after caou but aromatic edible fruits appear, which
 de. Requires a lot of space.
 1S
 grow to lengths of 30 cr
 have a taste similar to that of a pine-
 specimens. New leave
 brown and almost trans
 Use: Decorative room plant, requiring a
 lot of space. Suitable for trellising to
 l: Soilless mixture or light leaf mould
 ding: 3 grams per litre (1 oz. per
 ter: Should be kept moist all the year
 ht: Never direct sunlight. Thrives in
 Use: Well suited as cli
 alls, doorways and large windows.
 Soil: Soilless mixture
 with added peat. pH
 Feeding: 3 gram
 gallon) every
 Fertiliser sh
 moist soil
 trellises or walls or as a
 plant, also as a ground
 rvatories. An amusin
 s to allow the pla
 enveloped in mois
 soil
 on) every week (March-October).
 nd. Will not stand drying out.
 dy rooms, halls or staircases.
 t: Poor growth if temperature falls
 w minimum 15° C. (60° F.) during
 er
 st attractive and
 amount in t
 ss mixture
 rams per
 Frequent spraying. especially in
 lit positions, the
 spots and edges.
 Heat: Normal room temp
 not less than 12° C. (55° F
 Air: Syringe during gro
 up to very good centrall he
 Re-potting: Every 3 orA years
 Propagation: By cuttig top shoots with
 the aerial roots atta hed. They should
 be planted in equal arts of soilless mi:x
 ее
 ai
 otting: Every spring, in spacious
 agation:
 By cuttings in a green
 in an enclosed atmosphere, with
 e
 Mealy bug, red spider mite
 ially when the growing point is
 ri
 it
 e and sand, and must be kept moist
 and warm
 Varieties: borsig ina (but correctly
 Monstera pertus, which has smaller
 eaves and mor aerial roots than the
 type, and grows ore rapidly and vigor-
 ously. Can al be used in smaller
 rooms. This is e variety illustrated.
 NOTE: Aerial pots, which--like ordin
 ary rootss ve as ducts for transmit
 The sap in the leaves and stems is
 nous
 varieties: There are many hybrids
 this and other species with a
 variation in the distribution of
 en
 rs in the leaves. See also below.
 enbachia leopoldii
Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018
 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506
 WILEY Global Change
 PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE
 The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of
 dryland biocrust communities
 David J. Eldridge
 Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2.
 2,3
 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of
 Biological, Earth and Environmental
 Sciences, University of New South Wales,
 Sydney,New South Wales Australia
 Departamento de Biología y Geología,
 ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela
 uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y
 ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
 stoles, Spain
 operative Institute for Research in
 ironmental Sciences, University of
 rado, Boulder, Colorado
 Abstract
 Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic
 ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate
 hens and liverwor
 last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus
 To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c
 analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic
 predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species
 lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across
 km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the
 lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live
 cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t
 increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were
 with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen
 and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec
 spondence
 J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem
 e, School of Biological, Earth and
 mental Sciences, University of New
 Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia
 eldridge@unsw.edu.au
 groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation
 over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass
 increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci
Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this

Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this

Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
Ass, Bilbo, and Rey: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018
 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506
 WILEY Global Change
 PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE
 The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of
 dryland biocrust communities
 David J. Eldridge
 Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2.
 2,3
 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of
 Biological, Earth and Environmental
 Sciences, University of New South Wales,
 Sydney,New South Wales Australia
 Departamento de Biología y Geología,
 ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela
 uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y
 ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
 stoles, Spain
 operative Institute for Research in
 ironmental Sciences, University of
 rado, Boulder, Colorado
 Abstract
 Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic
 ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate
 hens and liverwor
 last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus
 To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c
 analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic
 predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species
 lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across
 km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the
 lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live
 cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t
 increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were
 with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen
 and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec
 spondence
 J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem
 e, School of Biological, Earth and
 mental Sciences, University of New
 Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia
 eldridge@unsw.edu.au
 groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation
 over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass
 increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci
Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this

Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this

Girls, Journey, and Run: Anonymous 01/23/19(Wed)04:49:15 No.12460541 insisted on knowing why my three- chapter submission to a literary agent was rejected >his assistant finally responded telling me the book was "overly fetishistic and lacked any kind of nuance or relationship with reality" 7 KB PNG asked her if I could edit what l'd sent them and submit it again with minor changes no response How do you even appeal to literary agents in this day and age? l he entire industry seems so rgged against anvbody with any originality or capacity for sincere expression :Anonymous 01/23/19(Wed)06:04:43 No.12460726 >>12460704 # A novel from the perspective of a boy who is crushed in his father's concrete plant and turns into a paving stone. It is his journey from there into the city where he observes a great many things as he observes the changes in the area where he is laid along a stretch of pavement, e.g romances, break ups, quarrels, gentrification etc. He learns to deal with people dropping chewing gum and cigarette butts onto him, and struggles emotionally when the street becomes run-down and more heavy-footed unkind people trample over him day and night. The story ends on a positive note, as he is transported to a seafront and reset on the pavement adjoining a beach, where barefoot girls and so on walk on him instead, making him happier and turning him into a man, so to speak. >>12460735 # >>12460736 # >>12460748 # >>12460752 # >>12460760 # >>12460789 # >>12460960 # >>12461047 # >>12461111 # >>12461154 # >>12461186 # >>12461234 # >>12461271 # >>12461440 # >>12461492 # >>12461521 # >>12461537 # >>12461627
Girls, Journey, and Run: Anonymous
 01/23/19(Wed)04:49:15 No.12460541
 insisted on knowing why my three-
 chapter submission to a literary agent
 was rejected
 >his assistant finally responded telling
 me the book was "overly fetishistic and
 lacked any kind of nuance or relationship
 with reality"
 7 KB PNG
 asked her if I could edit what l'd sent them and submit it
 again with minor changes
 no response
 How do you even appeal to literary agents in this day and
 age? l he entire industry seems so rgged against
 anvbody with any originality or capacity for sincere
 expression

 :Anonymous
 01/23/19(Wed)06:04:43 No.12460726
 >>12460704 #
 A novel from the perspective of a boy who is crushed in
 his father's concrete plant and turns into a paving stone. It
 is his journey from there into the city where he observes a
 great many things as he observes the changes in the
 area where he is laid along a stretch of pavement, e.g
 romances, break ups, quarrels, gentrification etc. He
 learns to deal with people dropping chewing gum and
 cigarette butts onto him, and struggles emotionally when
 the street becomes run-down and more heavy-footed
 unkind people trample over him day and night. The story
 ends on a positive note, as he is transported to a seafront
 and reset on the pavement adjoining a beach, where
 barefoot girls and so on walk on him instead, making him
 happier and turning him into a man, so to speak.
 >>12460735 # >>12460736 # >>12460748 # >>12460752 # >>12460760 #
 >>12460789 # >>12460960 # >>12461047 # >>12461111 # >>12461154 #
 >>12461186 # >>12461234 # >>12461271 # >>12461440 # >>12461492 #
 >>12461521 # >>12461537 # >>12461627