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America, Black History Month, and Chicago: <p>Black history month day 11: Ragtime composer Scott Joplin.</p> <p>Stock Joplin was born just three years after the end of the Civil War in 1868, to a former slave man and freeborn black woman. His father worked as a laborer for the railroad and his mother was a maid. When not working, his father liked to play the violin for plantation parties in North Carolina while his mother sang and played the banjo. Joplin was given a rudimentary musical education by his family and from the age of seven he was allowed to play the piano while his mother cleaned.</p> <p>Joplin was ambitious about learning piano, often practicing after school. He was tutored for a while by German Jew who had emigrated to America. This teacher taught him folk, classical, and opera music, encouraging him to recognize music as an art form. Joplin never forgot the man’s kindness and sent the ill and aging man a gift of money once he had become successful.</p> <p>Jump and did some work as a real way labor but decided to abandon this in pursuit of a musical career. He soon realized that there were not a lot of opportunities for black musicians, churches and brothels being the primary places he could play piano. But he saw some minor success at the Chicago world‘s fair and went on to published several significantly popular ragtime pieces.</p> <p>He composed an opera and move to New York to get it published, unfortunately art music was a field largely closed off the African-Americans. He did not get to see the opera have any success in his lifetime, although it was successfully staged in the 1970s.</p>
America, Black History Month, and Chicago: <p>Black history month day 11: Ragtime composer Scott Joplin.</p>

<p>Stock Joplin was born just three years after the end of the Civil War in 1868, to a former slave man and freeborn black woman. His father worked as a laborer for the railroad and his mother was a maid. When not working, his father liked to play the violin for plantation parties in North Carolina while his mother sang and played the banjo. Joplin was given a rudimentary musical education by his family and from the age of seven he was allowed to play the piano while his mother cleaned.</p>

<p>Joplin was ambitious about learning piano, often practicing after school. He was tutored for a while by German Jew who had emigrated to America. This teacher taught him folk, classical, and opera music, encouraging him to recognize music as an art form. Joplin never forgot the man’s kindness and sent the ill and aging man a gift of money once he had become successful.</p>

<p>Jump and did some work as a real way labor but decided to abandon this in pursuit of a musical career. He soon realized that there were not a lot of opportunities for black musicians, churches and brothels being the primary places he could play piano. But he saw some minor success at the Chicago world‘s fair and went on to published several significantly popular ragtime pieces.</p>

<p>He composed an opera and move to New York to get it published, unfortunately art music was a field largely closed off the African-Americans. He did not get to see the opera have any success in his lifetime, although it was successfully staged in the 1970s.</p>

Black history month day 11: Ragtime composer Scott Joplin. Stock Joplin was born just three years after the end of the Civil War in 1868, t...

Black History Month, Church, and Girls: <p>Black history month artistic figures day five: Singer, pianist, and activist Nina Simone.</p> <p>Nina Simone was born Eunice Kathleen Waymon in Tryon, North Carolina in 1933. She started playing piano when she was three years old and dreamed to one day become an a concert pianist. Her first official recital performance was it a classical recital when she was 12. Her parents, who had taken front row seats for the recital, were forced to move to the back due to segregation at the venue. When Simone found out about it, she refused to play until her parents were allowed to move back to the front. This event sparked her later activism.</p> <p>With the help of scholarship money, Simone was able to attend Allen High School for Girls in Asheville, North Carolina. After her graduation she spent the summer of 1950 at the Juilliard School, as a student of Carl Friedberg, preparing for her addition at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Despite a fantastic and well received audition, Simone was denied admission to the school. She suspected racial prejudice was to blame.</p> <p>In order to make ends meet, Simone ended up taking a job as a resident pianist and singer at a bar. This is when she changed her name from Eunice Waymon to Nina Simone, in order to disguise her identity from her minister parents who did not approve of her playing “the devil’s music“ in bars and clubs. Her mixture of genres, including jazz, blues, and classical music in her performances at the bar earned her a small but loyal fan base.</p> <p>Though she had always drawn on her African-American roots in her music, in the 60s and 70s Simone became very active in civil rights and anti-Vietnam causes. She wrote her now well known song “Mississippi Goddam” in response to racist attacks and murders, including the high profile Birmingham church bombing that killed for little black girls and partially blinded a fifth. She considered it her first civil rights anthem.</p> <p>Later in life Simone moved Barbados and then France, where she lived out her days until passing of breast cancer in 2003. Her ashes were scattered in several African countries and she is survived by one daughter, an actress and singer who uses the stage name Simone.</p>
Black History Month, Church, and Girls: <p>Black history month artistic figures day five: Singer, pianist, and activist Nina Simone.</p>

<p>Nina Simone was born Eunice Kathleen Waymon in Tryon, North Carolina in 1933. She started playing piano when she was three years old and dreamed to one day become an a concert pianist. Her first official recital performance was it a classical recital when she was 12. Her parents, who had taken front row seats for the recital, were forced to move to the back due to segregation at the venue. When Simone found out about it, she refused to play until her parents were allowed to move back to the front. This event sparked her later activism.</p>

<p>With the help of scholarship money, Simone was able to attend Allen High School for Girls in Asheville, North Carolina. After her graduation she spent the summer of 1950 at the Juilliard School, as a student of Carl Friedberg, preparing for her addition at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Despite a fantastic and well received audition, Simone was denied admission to the school. She suspected racial prejudice was to blame.</p>

<p>In order to make ends meet, Simone ended up taking a job as a resident pianist and singer at a bar. This is when she changed her name from Eunice Waymon to Nina Simone, in order to disguise her identity from her minister parents who did not approve of her playing “the devil’s music“ in bars and clubs. Her mixture of genres, including jazz, blues, and classical music in her performances at the bar earned her a small but loyal fan base.</p>

<p>Though she had always drawn on her African-American roots in her music, in the 60s and 70s Simone became very active in civil rights and anti-Vietnam causes. She wrote her now well known song “Mississippi Goddam” in response to racist attacks and murders, including the high profile Birmingham church bombing that killed for little black girls and partially blinded a fifth. She considered it her first civil rights anthem.</p>

<p>Later in life Simone moved Barbados and then France, where she lived out her days until passing of breast cancer in 2003. Her ashes were scattered in several African countries and she is survived by one daughter, an actress and singer who uses the stage name Simone.</p>

Black history month artistic figures day five: Singer, pianist, and activist Nina Simone. Nina Simone was born Eunice Kathleen Waymon in Tr...

Anna, Brains, and Church: SKILL HARD WORK TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL OF SKILL IN ANYTHING YOU HAVE TO STAND ON A PILLAR OF HARD WORK. OH, I JUST STARTED HERE TALENT & I HARD WORK TALENTHARD WORK owLTURD.com violent-darts: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”. I will qualify this a small but I think important amount, because what it is is actually complicated:  Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better hand-eye coordination. Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better pattern recognition. Or translations of audio input. Or whatever.  What this does is combine with @jelloapocalypse‘s EXTREMELY WELL-OBSERVED COMMENT (If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.) in a way that can be both invisible and give this kind of person a massive leg up while being really discouraging to someone who doesn’t have that wiring.  It doesn’t get to the actual original comic’s level of “oh I just started here”. But let’s take two people called Riley and Kennedy, and we’ll do singing, since that’s what I teach.  Riley and Kennedy have exactly the same kind of background: parents who listen to the radio sometimes, the usual social stuff around popular music of whatever genre, etc, but no formal training. Neither of them sings in a church choir, neither of them falls into a formal disability category, whatever.  The first time Riley shows up in my studio and we sing a really simple song I use as a diagnostic, she gets it mostly right. She can follow the tune; she can hear pitch, and it takes very little work for her to chivvy her voice into matching that pitch as long as there’s not something pulling her off. (In other words: as long as I’m singing the same notes as her and playing them on the piano, and as long a she can hear both herself and those notes).  For Riley the lesson is really fun and validating and she goes home and sings along to her own music for a while and comes back next week with six songs she wants to try learning. And most of her lessons are like that: pretty easy positive feedback. That means Riley “practices” a lot in exactly the way @jelloapocalypse describes, even if she doesn’t think she’s actually practicing (that is, sitting down to sing the songs we’re working on together in a systematic way) at all.  In contrast, the first time Kennedy comes to my studio, she struggles. It’s harder for her to hear the difference between notes, and it’s much harder for her to make her voice actually match the pitch she wants to sing at. When we pull out the diagnostic tune, she mostly manages to drone a few clusters of semi-tones, and while she can hear that she’s Off, it’s actually very hard for her to tell HOW she’s off, or what she should do to correct it.  In most cases, for Kennedy, lessons - and in fact the overall experience of singing - is not fun. It’s not validating. It’s a whole process of Not Being Good, of Doing Things Wrong, and given the way humans are often in casual situations being laughed at. When Kennedy goes home she doesn’t sing along with any music she plays: she keeps her lips pressed together and at best enjoys other people singing (and maybe feels envious and demeaned because she can’t do it).  Now the thing is, the practical “skill” difference for Riley and Kennedy here at the beginning is minimal. But the Rileys will tend (if they like what they’re doing) to ROCKET UP THE SKILL LEVEL, because of the “practice is fun so it’s just the thing I do” - because there is always a bunch of validation and positive reinforcement in the act of doing whatever it is, be it doodling or singing or math.  The Kennedys won’t. In fact if they’re not lucky enough to have a good teacher, and one who can put a lot of this into perspective for them, they will tend to be inhibited. The worst time is when a Riley and a Kennedy are friends and sign up to learn together, and Riley takes off and Kennedy’s left sitting there feeling like she’s somehow Deeply Flawed.   And in fact the whole Doctrine of “It’s Just About How Hard You Work” will in and of itself become part of what inhibits them, because they will watch the Rileys - and even the Annas, Anna in this metaphor being the Totally Normal Student who never really exists - grasp things faster than they do, even if they ARE working hard. And this will HAPPEN. They will watch this reality happen in front of them … and then people say to them “oh, it’s all about how hard you work, dear.” And it’s like being gaslit. (Well, to be fair: it IS being gaslit, just without malice intended on the part of the people doing it.)  And that message is horribly horribly toxic: here Kennedy is, and she IS working hard, but she’s still not progressing as fast as Riley or Anna no matter what she does! But it’s All About Hard Work, right? So that must mean that no matter how hard she THINKS she’s working, she’s actually just lazy, or doesn’t want it enough. It’s clearly a moral flaw in her.  I actually have, personally, really good luck with teaching the Kennedys because I literally have this conversation with them when they come to my studio. I actually outright tell them: firstly, anyone who has working vocal chords can sing. Anyone who has working vocal chords and the ability to distinguish audio pitch can even sing on key in tune! But some people have an easy time learning this and some people have a hard time, and sometimes which it is has some relationship to, say, “early exposure to music” or whatever but sometimes it seems to be utterly fucking random - pure luck of the draw.  You CAN SING. The capability is there. And if you want to we will find out how to make it happen. It might not happen as fast as for some other person, it might take more work, it might take more care, but that’s okay: that’s not your fault, that doesn’t mean you’re NOT working hard, but it does mean that here at the beginning we do things like recalibrate victories, we make your progress about YOU, not about Riley or Anna.  But I’m also not going to gaslight you or make you feel like you’re either delusional or somehow especially So Terrible You Don’t Fit In The Rest Of The World: sure, I’ve got some Riley-types who walk in here, noodle around, and we go on to Art Songs. They exist.  So what? Tall people exist. People with broad shoulders exist. People with dark hair exist. Physical embodiment and neurology hand out luck of the genetic roulette with no interest in outcomes. If you’re born blonde, it’s always going to take more work for you to have brown hair than someone born with brown hair, but much like dyeing your hair to match what you want, we can train the muscles of your voice and the neural pathways for hearing to do what you want.  The differences between Rileys and Kennedys are very small. If Riley didn’t discover she liked singing and Kennedy worked at it for years then no, Riley would not “start out” as good as Kennedy is after those years. And you can be Riley and if you DON’T do the fucking work, the Annas of the world especially will blast past you and leave you in the dust.  But on the other hand the Rileys get this wonderful cycle of positive reinforcement that does often start from a place of their coincidental physical embodiment giving them a slight leg up. And pretending that’s not the case does a big disservice to the Kennedys.  We just absolutely do need to reframe that for what it is (a tiny fundamental difference and then a HELL OF A LOT OF “this is fun so I practice more so I get more validation so I -” and more or less no moral meaning at all), what it doesn’t mean, and how to compensate for it. 
Anna, Brains, and Church: SKILL
 HARD
 WORK
 TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL
 OF SKILL IN ANYTHING
 YOU HAVE TO STAND ON
 A PILLAR OF HARD WORK.
 OH, I JUST
 STARTED
 HERE
 TALENT & I HARD
 WORK
 TALENTHARD
 WORK
 owLTURD.com
violent-darts:

charlesoberonn:

jelloapocalypse:

These bother me sometimes.
We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.


I will qualify this a small but I think important amount, because what it is is actually complicated: 
Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better hand-eye coordination. Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better pattern recognition. Or translations of audio input. Or whatever. 
What this does is combine with @jelloapocalypse‘s EXTREMELY WELL-OBSERVED COMMENT (If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.) in a way that can be both invisible and give this kind of person a massive leg up while being really discouraging to someone who doesn’t have that wiring. 
It doesn’t get to the actual original comic’s level of “oh I just started here”. But let’s take two people called Riley and Kennedy, and we’ll do singing, since that’s what I teach. 
Riley and Kennedy have exactly the same kind of background: parents who listen to the radio sometimes, the usual social stuff around popular music of whatever genre, etc, but no formal training. Neither of them sings in a church choir, neither of them falls into a formal disability category, whatever. 
The first time Riley shows up in my studio and we sing a really simple song I use as a diagnostic, she gets it mostly right. She can follow the tune; she can hear pitch, and it takes very little work for her to chivvy her voice into matching that pitch as long as there’s not something pulling her off. (In other words: as long as I’m singing the same notes as her and playing them on the piano, and as long a she can hear both herself and those notes). 
For Riley the lesson is really fun and validating and she goes home and sings along to her own music for a while and comes back next week with six songs she wants to try learning. And most of her lessons are like that: pretty easy positive feedback. That means Riley “practices” a lot in exactly the way @jelloapocalypse describes, even if she doesn’t think she’s actually practicing (that is, sitting down to sing the songs we’re working on together in a systematic way) at all. 
In contrast, the first time Kennedy comes to my studio, she struggles. It’s harder for her to hear the difference between notes, and it’s much harder for her to make her voice actually match the pitch she wants to sing at. When we pull out the diagnostic tune, she mostly manages to drone a few clusters of semi-tones, and while she can hear that she’s Off, it’s actually very hard for her to tell HOW she’s off, or what she should do to correct it. 
In most cases, for Kennedy, lessons - and in fact the overall experience of singing - is not fun. It’s not validating. It’s a whole process of Not Being Good, of Doing Things Wrong, and given the way humans are often in casual situations being laughed at. When Kennedy goes home she doesn’t sing along with any music she plays: she keeps her lips pressed together and at best enjoys other people singing (and maybe feels envious and demeaned because she can’t do it). 
Now the thing is, the practical “skill” difference for Riley and Kennedy here at the beginning is minimal. But the Rileys will tend (if they like what they’re doing) to ROCKET UP THE SKILL LEVEL, because of the “practice is fun so it’s just the thing I do” - because there is always a bunch of validation and positive reinforcement in the act of doing whatever it is, be it doodling or singing or math. 
The Kennedys won’t. In fact if they’re not lucky enough to have a good teacher, and one who can put a lot of this into perspective for them, they will tend to be inhibited. The worst time is when a Riley and a Kennedy are friends and sign up to learn together, and Riley takes off and Kennedy’s left sitting there feeling like she’s somehow Deeply Flawed. 
 And in fact the whole Doctrine of “It’s Just About How Hard You Work” will in and of itself become part of what inhibits them, because they will watch the Rileys - and even the Annas, Anna in this metaphor being the Totally Normal Student who never really exists - grasp things faster than they do, even if they ARE working hard. And this will HAPPEN. They will watch this reality happen in front of them … and then people say to them “oh, it’s all about how hard you work, dear.” And it’s like being gaslit. (Well, to be fair: it IS being gaslit, just without malice intended on the part of the people doing it.) 
And that message is horribly horribly toxic: here Kennedy is, and she IS working hard, but she’s still not progressing as fast as Riley or Anna no matter what she does! But it’s All About Hard Work, right? So that must mean that no matter how hard she THINKS she’s working, she’s actually just lazy, or doesn’t want it enough. It’s clearly a moral flaw in her. 
I actually have, personally, really good luck with teaching the Kennedys because I literally have this conversation with them when they come to my studio. I actually outright tell them: firstly, anyone who has working vocal chords can sing. Anyone who has working vocal chords and the ability to distinguish audio pitch can even sing on key in tune! But some people have an easy time learning this and some people have a hard time, and sometimes which it is has some relationship to, say, “early exposure to music” or whatever but sometimes it seems to be utterly fucking random - pure luck of the draw. 
You CAN SING. The capability is there. And if you want to we will find out how to make it happen. It might not happen as fast as for some other person, it might take more work, it might take more care, but that’s okay: that’s not your fault, that doesn’t mean you’re NOT working hard, but it does mean that here at the beginning we do things like recalibrate victories, we make your progress about YOU, not about Riley or Anna. 
But I’m also not going to gaslight you or make you feel like you’re either delusional or somehow especially So Terrible You Don’t Fit In The Rest Of The World: sure, I’ve got some Riley-types who walk in here, noodle around, and we go on to Art Songs. They exist. 
So what? Tall people exist. People with broad shoulders exist. People with dark hair exist. Physical embodiment and neurology hand out luck of the genetic roulette with no interest in outcomes. If you’re born blonde, it’s always going to take more work for you to have brown hair than someone born with brown hair, but much like dyeing your hair to match what you want, we can train the muscles of your voice and the neural pathways for hearing to do what you want. 
The differences between Rileys and Kennedys are very small. If Riley didn’t discover she liked singing and Kennedy worked at it for years then no, Riley would not “start out” as good as Kennedy is after those years. And you can be Riley and if you DON’T do the fucking work, the Annas of the world especially will blast past you and leave you in the dust. 
But on the other hand the Rileys get this wonderful cycle of positive reinforcement that does often start from a place of their coincidental physical embodiment giving them a slight leg up. And pretending that’s not the case does a big disservice to the Kennedys. 
We just absolutely do need to reframe that for what it is (a tiny fundamental difference and then a HELL OF A LOT OF “this is fun so I practice more so I get more validation so I -” and more or less no moral meaning at all), what it doesn’t mean, and how to compensate for it. 

violent-darts: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ti...

Crying, Target, and Tumblr: er roderich-edelfine: romano-is-crying:Source ~ Artist grungy PruAus + Roddy and Gil at the piano together?  ❤ ❤ ❤!
Crying, Target, and Tumblr: er
roderich-edelfine:

romano-is-crying:Source ~ Artist
grungy PruAus + Roddy and Gil at the piano together? 

❤



❤



❤!

roderich-edelfine: romano-is-crying:Source ~ Artist grungy PruAus + Roddy and Gil at the piano together?  ❤ ❤ ❤!

Birthday, Memes, and Wshh: 25 2 10 AliciaKeys celebrated her birthday last night with legendary piano player ChickCorea on the keys! 🎹🎂🎈 @AliciaKeys WSHH
Birthday, Memes, and Wshh: 25 2
 10
AliciaKeys celebrated her birthday last night with legendary piano player ChickCorea on the keys! 🎹🎂🎈 @AliciaKeys WSHH

AliciaKeys celebrated her birthday last night with legendary piano player ChickCorea on the keys! 🎹🎂🎈 @AliciaKeys WSHH

Ass, Bad, and Birthday: Joan Jett B A D R E P U T A T I O N 7912-3 7065- 1 BAD REPUTATION YOU DON'T OWN ME Piano-Kenny Laguna ve leber. Bin rs: I. Madara, D. White Rhythm Guitar-Joan Jett, Steve Jones Lead Guitar-Steve Jones Bass-Steve Jones Drums-Paul Cook Saxophone-Mick Eve Piano-Jeff Bannister c Inc-BMI) ttorney: Paul Schindler Saxophone-John Earle Backing vocals-Joan Jett, Kenny Laguna Kupersmith Uett Pack Music-BMIiOn The Backing vocals-Joan Jett. Kenny La DON'T ABUSE ME Writer loan Jett Vett Pack Music-8MI On The Booking Agent: FB Sleeve Concept and Photography-Barry Ryan Sleeve Design-The Hutton Company ngineer (Chappell Studios) Stuart Panes guna Boardwalk Musie-BMI Rhythm Guitar-Joan Jett, Lea Hart Lead Gultar-Joan Jett Piano-Kenny Laguna Drums-Paul Simmons Bass-Jeff Peters Backing vocals-Kenny Laguna, Ritchie 250 W 57th St. New York, New York Ritchie Cordell Recorded-Rampert, December 1979 LET ME GO Boardwalk Music-8M1) tudio, Marc Ritchie Cordell (Jett TOO BAD ON YOUR BIRTHDAY Tambourine-Kenny Laguna Recorded-Ramport, Maich 1980 ass-Steve Jones Drums-Paul Cook Drums-Paul Simmons Sean Tyla·Buzz Chanter, Martin Watson Writers: Artie Reseick, Karp (Medulla MAKE BELIEVE t/Solo e Jones and Paul Cook appear courtesy of Lea Hart and Jeff Peters (Roll-ups) appear Clem Burke appears courtesy of Chrysalis This album is dedicated to Dr. Richard Aniola Writers: Bo Gentry Joey Levine lett Pack Music- BMI) Gultar-Joan Jett, Lea Hart cuitd culan Jioan Jet, BuZat Frakat hchite cordel Tubular Bells-Commander Goonwaddle Plano, Clavinet, Organ-Kenny Laguna Recorded Recorded-Chappell Studio, March 1979 WOOLY BULLY Drums-Paul Simmons Backing vocals-Joan Jett, Kenny Laguna Recorded-Ramport.January 1980 DO YOU WANNA TOUCH ME (OH YEAH) niters Gary Glitter Mike leander (Leeds Music Writers Gary Glitter, Mike Leander (Duchess Music idge House Records DOING ALL RIGHT WITH THE BOYS ano Drums-Paul Simmons Bass-Jeff Peters (Beckie Publishin Int -BM) Guitar Frank Infante, Joan Jett Piano-Kenny Laguna Drums-Clem Burke Bass-Micky Groome Backing vocals-Kenny Laguna Chest Slaps and Hysterics-Ritchie Cordell Recorded- Ramport. December 1 and the Baltimore Orioles cking vocals-Joan Jett, Kenny Laguna, Ritchie Cordell Tambourine-Kenny Laguna Recorded-Ramport, January 1980 Rhythm Gultar Joan Jett, Lea Hart Lead Guitar-Lea Hart JETT LAG PRODUCTIONS Corporation-MCA-BMI) Guitar-Joan Jett, Lea Hart Piano-Kenny Laguna Orums-Paul Simmons For fan club or other information write to loan lett PO Box 600 Long Beach, New York Il YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU'VE GOT an Jett, Kenny Laguna, Boardmalk Mus ael, leff lelers, PauecertedRpert, becenter 1979 JEZEBEL neer and Associate Producer Recorded-Ramport, Decem Backing vocals -Joan Jett, Keny Laguna, SHOUT ean Jett. Keaty L I98i Boardwak Recards Inc factured by Boardwalk Records tainment Compary 5884 Saata Monica Recorded-Fidelity Augu and Rampert. December Isley (No Boulevard Beverly Hills Calfornia 90212 Inc.-BMI Unauthorized duplicat melvinomusic: Joan Jett Bad Reputation Number of LPs: 1 Label: Boardwalk Records Release Year on Jacket: 1981 The Good: A1 – Bad Reputation A4 – You Don’t Own Me B1 – Shout B4 – Jezebel B5 – Don’t Abuse Me The Bad: A2 – Make Believe Overall Rating: A Would You Recommend: Joan Jett has been a powerhouse her whole career. Her gruff vocals are very distinct, as is her look. She has more than proved herself in the punk rock world. Her music does tend to be more mainstream, but she can kick it out when she wants to. I think this album is a great album, that shows how gritty she can get. Her cover of You Don’t Own Me is my favorite version of the song ever. This is a must listen to, because it is excellent. Spotify Link:
Ass, Bad, and Birthday: Joan Jett
 B A D R E P U T A T I O N

 7912-3 7065- 1
 BAD REPUTATION
 YOU DON'T OWN ME
 Piano-Kenny Laguna
 ve leber. Bin
 rs: I. Madara, D. White
 Rhythm Guitar-Joan Jett, Steve Jones
 Lead Guitar-Steve Jones
 Bass-Steve Jones
 Drums-Paul Cook
 Saxophone-Mick Eve
 Piano-Jeff Bannister
 c Inc-BMI)
 ttorney: Paul Schindler
 Saxophone-John Earle
 Backing vocals-Joan Jett, Kenny Laguna
 Kupersmith Uett Pack Music-BMIiOn The
 Backing vocals-Joan Jett. Kenny La
 DON'T ABUSE ME
 Writer loan Jett Vett Pack Music-8MI On The
 Booking Agent: FB
 Sleeve Concept and Photography-Barry Ryan
 Sleeve Design-The Hutton Company
 ngineer (Chappell Studios) Stuart Panes
 guna
 Boardwalk Musie-BMI
 Rhythm Guitar-Joan Jett, Lea Hart
 Lead Gultar-Joan Jett
 Piano-Kenny Laguna
 Drums-Paul Simmons
 Bass-Jeff Peters
 Backing vocals-Kenny Laguna, Ritchie
 250 W 57th St.
 New York, New York
 Ritchie Cordell
 Recorded-Rampert, December 1979
 LET ME GO
 Boardwalk Music-8M1)
 tudio, Marc
 Ritchie Cordell (Jett
 TOO BAD ON YOUR BIRTHDAY
 Tambourine-Kenny Laguna
 Recorded-Ramport, Maich 1980
 ass-Steve Jones
 Drums-Paul Cook
 Drums-Paul Simmons
 Sean Tyla·Buzz Chanter, Martin Watson
 Writers: Artie Reseick, Karp (Medulla
 MAKE BELIEVE
 t/Solo
 e Jones and Paul Cook appear courtesy of
 Lea Hart and Jeff Peters (Roll-ups) appear
 Clem Burke appears courtesy of Chrysalis
 This album is dedicated to Dr. Richard Aniola
 Writers: Bo Gentry Joey Levine lett Pack Music- BMI)
 Gultar-Joan Jett, Lea Hart
 cuitd culan Jioan Jet, BuZat Frakat hchite cordel
 Tubular Bells-Commander Goonwaddle
 Plano, Clavinet, Organ-Kenny Laguna
 Recorded
 Recorded-Chappell Studio, March 1979
 WOOLY BULLY
 Drums-Paul Simmons
 Backing vocals-Joan Jett, Kenny Laguna
 Recorded-Ramport.January 1980
 DO YOU WANNA TOUCH ME (OH YEAH) niters Gary Glitter Mike leander (Leeds Music
 Writers Gary Glitter, Mike Leander (Duchess Music
 idge House Records
 DOING ALL RIGHT WITH THE BOYS
 ano
 Drums-Paul Simmons
 Bass-Jeff Peters
 (Beckie Publishin
 Int -BM)
 Guitar Frank Infante, Joan Jett
 Piano-Kenny Laguna
 Drums-Clem Burke
 Bass-Micky Groome
 Backing vocals-Kenny Laguna
 Chest Slaps and Hysterics-Ritchie Cordell
 Recorded- Ramport. December 1
 and the Baltimore Orioles
 cking vocals-Joan Jett, Kenny Laguna,
 Ritchie Cordell
 Tambourine-Kenny Laguna
 Recorded-Ramport, January 1980
 Rhythm Gultar Joan Jett, Lea Hart
 Lead Guitar-Lea Hart
 JETT LAG PRODUCTIONS
 Corporation-MCA-BMI)
 Guitar-Joan Jett, Lea Hart
 Piano-Kenny Laguna
 Orums-Paul Simmons
 For fan club or other
 information write to
 loan lett PO Box 600
 Long Beach, New York Il
 YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU'VE GOT
 an Jett, Kenny Laguna,
 Boardmalk Mus
 ael, leff lelers, PauecertedRpert, becenter 1979
 JEZEBEL
 neer and Associate Producer
 Recorded-Ramport, Decem
 Backing vocals -Joan Jett, Keny Laguna,
 SHOUT
 ean Jett. Keaty L
 I98i Boardwak Recards Inc
 factured by Boardwalk Records
 tainment Compary 5884 Saata Monica
 Recorded-Fidelity Augu
 and Rampert. December
 Isley (No
 Boulevard Beverly Hills Calfornia 90212
 Inc.-BMI
 Unauthorized duplicat
melvinomusic:

Joan Jett
Bad Reputation

Number of LPs: 1
Label: Boardwalk Records
Release Year on Jacket: 1981

The Good:
A1 – Bad Reputation
A4 – You Don’t Own Me
B1 – Shout
B4 – Jezebel
B5 – Don’t Abuse Me

The Bad: 
A2 – Make Believe

Overall Rating:  A
Would You Recommend: 
Joan Jett has been a powerhouse her whole career. Her gruff vocals are very distinct, as is her look. She has more than proved herself in the punk rock world. Her music does tend to be more mainstream, but she can kick it out when she wants to. I think this album is a great album, that shows how gritty she can get. Her cover of You Don’t Own Me is my favorite version of the song ever. This is a must listen to, because it is excellent. 
Spotify Link:

melvinomusic: Joan Jett Bad Reputation Number of LPs: 1 Label: Boardwalk Records Release Year on Jacket: 1981 The Good: A1 – Bad Reputati...

Tumblr, Blog, and Http: (ART setheverman: just got a grand piano and you know what that means
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setheverman:


just got a grand piano and you know what that means

setheverman: just got a grand piano and you know what that means