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Was

Was

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Travelling

Travelling

Reunited
Reunited

Reunited

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That

That

Distracte
Distracte

Distracte

Passengers
Passengers

Passengers

Suspicious
Suspicious

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station

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 reassuring

reassuring

🔥 | Latest

Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO CRASH-LAND A PLANE ON WATER These instructions apply to small passenger propeller planes (not commercial airliners). 1 Take your place at the controls. If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your seat belt. 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call for help. There will be a control button on the yoke (the plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give your situation, destination, and plane call numbers (which should be printed on the top of the instru- ment panel). If you get no response, try again on the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the other end should be able to talk you through proper landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to talk you through the landing process, you will have to do it alone. beading airspeed indicator altimeter fuel gauge yoke throttle landing gear 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments. YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up, push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the nose of the plane should be about three inches below the horizon. ф awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills
Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO
 CRASH-LAND
 A PLANE ON WATER
 These instructions apply to small passenger propeller
 planes (not commercial airliners).
 1 Take your place at the controls.
 If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the
 left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one
 set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove
 the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your
 seat belt.
 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call
 for help.
 There will be a control button on the yoke (the
 plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on
 the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk
 release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give
 your situation, destination, and plane call numbers
 (which should be printed on the top of the instru-
 ment panel). If you get no response, try again on
 the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the
 other end should be able to talk you through proper
 landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to
 talk you through the landing process, you will have
 to do it alone.

 beading
 airspeed indicator
 altimeter
 fuel gauge
 yoke
 throttle
 landing gear
 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments.
 YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in
 front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its
 pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up,
 push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the
 plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The
 yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in
 either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the
 nose of the plane should be about three inches below
 the horizon.
 ф
awesomage:

The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO CRASH-LAND A PLANE ON WATER These instructions apply to small passenger propeller planes (not commercial airliners). 1 Take your place at the controls. If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your seat belt. 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call for help. There will be a control button on the yoke (the plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give your situation, destination, and plane call numbers (which should be printed on the top of the instru- ment panel). If you get no response, try again on the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the other end should be able to talk you through proper landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to talk you through the landing process, you will have to do it alone. beading airspeed indicator altimeter fuel gauge yoke throttle landing gear 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments. YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up, push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the nose of the plane should be about three inches below the horizon. ф awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills
Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO
 CRASH-LAND
 A PLANE ON WATER
 These instructions apply to small passenger propeller
 planes (not commercial airliners).
 1 Take your place at the controls.
 If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the
 left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one
 set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove
 the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your
 seat belt.
 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call
 for help.
 There will be a control button on the yoke (the
 plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on
 the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk
 release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give
 your situation, destination, and plane call numbers
 (which should be printed on the top of the instru-
 ment panel). If you get no response, try again on
 the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the
 other end should be able to talk you through proper
 landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to
 talk you through the landing process, you will have
 to do it alone.

 beading
 airspeed indicator
 altimeter
 fuel gauge
 yoke
 throttle
 landing gear
 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments.
 YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in
 front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its
 pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up,
 push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the
 plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The
 yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in
 either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the
 nose of the plane should be about three inches below
 the horizon.
 ф
awesomage:

The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO CRASH-LAND A PLANE ON WATER These instructions apply to small passenger propeller planes (not commercial airliners). 1 Take your place at the controls. If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your seat belt. 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call for help. There will be a control button on the yoke (the plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give your situation, destination, and plane call numbers (which should be printed on the top of the instru- ment panel). If you get no response, try again on the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the other end should be able to talk you through proper landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to talk you through the landing process, you will have to do it alone. beading airspeed indicator altimeter fuel gauge yoke throttle landing gear 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments. YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up, push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the nose of the plane should be about three inches below the horizon. ф awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills
Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO
 CRASH-LAND
 A PLANE ON WATER
 These instructions apply to small passenger propeller
 planes (not commercial airliners).
 1 Take your place at the controls.
 If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the
 left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one
 set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove
 the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your
 seat belt.
 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call
 for help.
 There will be a control button on the yoke (the
 plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on
 the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk
 release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give
 your situation, destination, and plane call numbers
 (which should be printed on the top of the instru-
 ment panel). If you get no response, try again on
 the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the
 other end should be able to talk you through proper
 landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to
 talk you through the landing process, you will have
 to do it alone.

 beading
 airspeed indicator
 altimeter
 fuel gauge
 yoke
 throttle
 landing gear
 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments.
 YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in
 front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its
 pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up,
 push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the
 plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The
 yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in
 either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the
 nose of the plane should be about three inches below
 the horizon.
 ф
awesomage:

The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO CRASH-LAND A PLANE ON WATER These instructions apply to small passenger propeller planes (not commercial airliners). 1 Take your place at the controls. If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your seat belt. 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call for help. There will be a control button on the yoke (the plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give your situation, destination, and plane call numbers (which should be printed on the top of the instru- ment panel). If you get no response, try again on the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the other end should be able to talk you through proper landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to talk you through the landing process, you will have to do it alone. beading airspeed indicator altimeter fuel gauge yoke throttle landing gear 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments. YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up, push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the nose of the plane should be about three inches below the horizon. ф awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills
Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO
 CRASH-LAND
 A PLANE ON WATER
 These instructions apply to small passenger propeller
 planes (not commercial airliners).
 1 Take your place at the controls.
 If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the
 left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one
 set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove
 the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your
 seat belt.
 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call
 for help.
 There will be a control button on the yoke (the
 plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on
 the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk
 release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give
 your situation, destination, and plane call numbers
 (which should be printed on the top of the instru-
 ment panel). If you get no response, try again on
 the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the
 other end should be able to talk you through proper
 landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to
 talk you through the landing process, you will have
 to do it alone.

 beading
 airspeed indicator
 altimeter
 fuel gauge
 yoke
 throttle
 landing gear
 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments.
 YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in
 front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its
 pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up,
 push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the
 plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The
 yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in
 either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the
 nose of the plane should be about three inches below
 the horizon.
 ф
awesomage:

The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO CRASH-LAND A PLANE ON WATER These instructions apply to small passenger propeller planes (not commercial airliners). 1 Take your place at the controls. If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your seat belt. 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call for help. There will be a control button on the yoke (the plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give your situation, destination, and plane call numbers (which should be printed on the top of the instru- ment panel). If you get no response, try again on the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the other end should be able to talk you through proper landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to talk you through the landing process, you will have to do it alone. beading airspeed indicator altimeter fuel gauge yoke throttle landing gear 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments. YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up, push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the nose of the plane should be about three inches below the horizon. ф awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills
Being Alone, Radio, and The Worst: |HOW TO
 CRASH-LAND
 A PLANE ON WATER
 These instructions apply to small passenger propeller
 planes (not commercial airliners).
 1 Take your place at the controls.
 If the plane has dual controls, the pilot will be in the
 left seat. Sit on the right. If the plane has only one
 set of controls and the pilot is unconscious, remove
 the pilot from the pilot's seat. Securely fasten your
 seat belt.
 2 Put on the radio headset (if there is one) and call
 for help.
 There will be a control button on the yoke (the
 plane's steering wheel) or a CB-like microphone on
 the instrument panel. Depress the button to talk
 release it to listen. Say "Mayday! Mayday!" and give
 your situation, destination, and plane call numbers
 (which should be printed on the top of the instru-
 ment panel). If you get no response, try again on
 the emergency channel, 121.5. The person on the
 other end should be able to talk you through proper
 landing procedures. If you cannot reach someone to
 talk you through the landing process, you will have
 to do it alone.

 beading
 airspeed indicator
 altimeter
 fuel gauge
 yoke
 throttle
 landing gear
 3 Get your bearings and identify the instruments.
 YOKE. This is the steering wheel, and it should be in
 front of you. The yoke turns the plane and controls its
 pitch. Pull back on the column to bring the nose up,
 push forward to point it down. Turn it left to turn the
 plane left, turn it right to turn the plane right. The
 yoke is very sensitive-move it only an inch or two in
 either direction to turn the plane. While cruising, the
 nose of the plane should be about three inches below
 the horizon.
 ф
awesomage:

The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

awesomage: The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Man Skills

New York, Australia, and Flight: Don't fly me, It has been reported that an employee for Ansett Australia (Airlines), who happened to have the last name of Gay, got on a plane recently using the company's 'Free Flight' offer for staff. However, when Mr Gay tried to take his seat, he found it being occupied by a fare paying passenger. So, not to make a fuss, he simply chose another seat. Unknown to Mr Gay another Ansett flight at the airport experienced mechanical problems. The passengers of this flight were being re-routed to various other airplanes A few were put on Mr Gay's flight and anyone who was holding a free ticket was being 'bumped. Ansett officials, armed with a list of these freebee' ticket holders boarded the plane, as is the practise, to remove them in favour of fare paying passengers. Of course, our Mr Gay was not sitting in his assigned seat as you may remember. So when the Ticket Agent approached the seat where Mr Gay was supposed to be sitting, she asked a startled customer "Are you gay?" The man, shyly nodded that he was, at which point she demanded: "Then you have to get off the plane." Mr Gay, overhearing what the Agent had said, tried to clear up the situation: "You've got the wrong man. I'm Gay!" This caused an angry third passenger to yell "Hell! I'm gay too! They can't kick us all off! Confusion reined as more and more passengers began yelling that Ansett had no right to remove gays from their flights. New York Times The Plane Had a Hard Time Flying Straight After That
New York, Australia, and Flight: Don't fly me,
 It has been reported that an
 employee for Ansett Australia
 (Airlines), who happened to have the last name of Gay, got
 on a plane recently using the company's 'Free Flight' offer
 for staff. However, when Mr Gay tried to take his seat, he
 found it being occupied by a fare paying passenger.
 So, not to make a fuss, he simply chose another seat. Unknown to Mr Gay
 another Ansett flight at the airport experienced mechanical problems. The
 passengers of this flight were being re-routed to various other airplanes
 A few were put on Mr Gay's flight and anyone who was holding a free
 ticket was being 'bumped. Ansett officials, armed with a list of these
 freebee' ticket holders boarded the plane, as is the practise, to remove
 them in favour of fare paying passengers. Of course, our Mr Gay was not
 sitting in his assigned seat as you may remember. So when the Ticket Agent
 approached the seat where Mr Gay was supposed to be sitting, she asked a
 startled customer "Are you gay?" The man, shyly nodded that he was, at
 which point she demanded: "Then you have to get off the plane."
 Mr Gay, overhearing what the Agent had said, tried to clear up the
 situation: "You've got the wrong man. I'm Gay!" This caused an angry
 third passenger to yell "Hell! I'm gay too! They can't kick us all off!
 Confusion reined as more and more passengers began yelling that Ansett
 had no right to remove gays from their flights. New York Times
The Plane Had a Hard Time Flying Straight After That

The Plane Had a Hard Time Flying Straight After That

Beautiful, Bones, and Goals: endlings THE LAST OF THEIR KIND Marta AOnesone Benjamin 1936 Gesge ENAMEL PIN SERIES by kory bing plesiosaur bones KORYG Beniamin back and clasp placement 1.75" wide Antique Bronze Metal recessed Antique Bronze Metal White Pantone 2253 C Benjamin Pantone 555 C Pantone 7412 C Pantone 461C Pantone 617 C Pantone 1375 C 1936 Pantone 360 C Pantone 160 C Pantone 484 C Pantone 173 C Martha Martha plesiosaur bones ORYG back and clasp placement 1.75" wide Antique Copper Metal Pantone 475 C 1911 Pantone 415 C Pantone 160 C Pantone 486 C | Pantone 1545 C Pantone 425 C Pantone 1675 C Pantone 360 C Pantone 5865 C onesome (G CAROMESONE plesiosaur bones KORYING COM 209 1.75" tall Antique Nickel Metal back and clasp placement Pantone 454 C GeOge Pantone 7490 C Pantone 618 C Pantone 5135 C Pantone 394 C Pantone 3995 C stretch goals. $2000 LOKED! (designs not yet final) TeUGHEL $3000 LOCKED! ANCAS $2500 LOCKED! TORGI 1996 FATU $5000 $3500 LOCKED! LOCKED! $4000 LOCKED! $4500 LOCKED! NAJIN BOOKING BEN CELLA e B-ND (200 1987 sixth-extinction: korybing: korybing: korybing: korybing: theboredbaptist: korybing: ENDLINGS: LAST OF THEIR KIND ENAMEL PIN SET I launched a new kickstarter! This one commemorates Endlings, individuals that were the last of their kind before their species went extinct. All of their stories are sad, but I think it’s important to remember them, especially since they all went extinct so recently! The first three pins are Benjamin, the last Thylacine, Martha, the last Passenger Pigeon, and Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island Tortoise! With more to unlock, starting with Incas, the last Carolina Parakeet! I’m REALLY excited about this project, so please pledge! The pins will be beautiful!! didn’t george repopulate his entire species? Sadly, no. He was the only tortoise found on Pinta Island in 1973, as feral goats introduced by humans had destroyed most of the vegetation on the island. Efforts were made to save George’s DNA in the form of hybrids with closely-related tortoise species ever since. Three clutches of eggs were laid throughout his remaining lifetime, but none ever hatched, and George died in 2012. Incas and Turgi stretch goals have been unlocked! Toughie the Rabbs’ Fringe-Limbed Frog and Booming Ben the Heath Hen have been unlocked! ALL THE PINS HAVE BEEN UNLOCKED! A full set of Endlings pins is now TEN pins! Wow! All stretch goals unlocked! Go get yourself some gorgeous pins!
Beautiful, Bones, and Goals: endlings
 THE LAST OF THEIR KIND
 Marta
 AOnesone
 Benjamin
 1936
 Gesge
 ENAMEL PIN SERIES
 by kory bing

 plesiosaur bones
 KORYG
 Beniamin
 back and clasp placement
 1.75" wide
 Antique Bronze Metal
 recessed Antique Bronze Metal
 White
 Pantone 2253 C
 Benjamin
 Pantone 555 C
 Pantone 7412 C
 Pantone 461C
 Pantone 617 C
 Pantone 1375 C
 1936
 Pantone 360 C
 Pantone 160 C
 Pantone 484 C
 Pantone 173 C

 Martha
 Martha
 plesiosaur bones
 ORYG
 back and clasp placement
 1.75" wide
 Antique Copper Metal
 Pantone 475 C
 1911
 Pantone 415 C
 Pantone 160 C
 Pantone 486 C
 | Pantone 1545 C
 Pantone 425 C
 Pantone 1675 C
 Pantone 360 C
 Pantone 5865 C

 onesome
 (G
 CAROMESONE
 plesiosaur bones
 KORYING COM
 209
 1.75" tall
 Antique Nickel Metal
 back and clasp placement
 Pantone 454 C
 GeOge
 Pantone 7490 C
 Pantone 618 C
 Pantone 5135 C
 Pantone 394 C
 Pantone 3995 C

 stretch goals.
 $2000 LOKED!
 (designs not yet final)
 TeUGHEL
 $3000
 LOCKED!
 ANCAS
 $2500
 LOCKED!
 TORGI
 1996
 FATU
 $5000
 $3500
 LOCKED!
 LOCKED!
 $4000
 LOCKED!
 $4500
 LOCKED!
 NAJIN
 BOOKING BEN
 CELLA e B-ND
 (200
 1987
sixth-extinction:

korybing:

korybing:

korybing:

korybing:

theboredbaptist:

korybing:

ENDLINGS: LAST OF THEIR KIND ENAMEL PIN SET
I launched a new kickstarter! This one commemorates Endlings, individuals that were the last of their kind before their species went extinct. All of their stories are sad, but I think it’s important to remember them, especially since they all went extinct so recently!
The first three pins are Benjamin, the last Thylacine, Martha, the last Passenger Pigeon, and Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island Tortoise! With more to unlock, starting with Incas, the last Carolina Parakeet!
I’m REALLY excited about this project, so please pledge! The pins will be beautiful!!

didn’t george repopulate his entire species?

Sadly, no. He was the only tortoise found on Pinta Island in 1973, as feral goats introduced by humans had destroyed most of the vegetation on the island. Efforts were made to save George’s DNA in the form of hybrids with closely-related tortoise species ever since. Three clutches of eggs were laid throughout his remaining lifetime, but none ever hatched, and George died in 2012.

Incas and Turgi stretch goals have been unlocked!

Toughie the Rabbs’ Fringe-Limbed Frog and Booming Ben the Heath Hen have been unlocked!

ALL THE PINS HAVE BEEN UNLOCKED! A full set of Endlings pins is now TEN pins! Wow!
All stretch goals unlocked! Go get yourself some gorgeous pins!

sixth-extinction: korybing: korybing: korybing: korybing: theboredbaptist: korybing: ENDLINGS: LAST OF THEIR KIND ENAMEL PIN SET I la...