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No Buts: Lifting to Failure Good or Bad? One muscle fiber (cell) One fascicle (bundle of muscle fibers) Connective tissue Muscle Myofibril Blood vessels and nerves Tendon @strengthcoachtherapy strengtt Myofibrils Striations Nucleus A review of literature and best practice SHOULD YOU LIFT TO FAILURE? - πŸš€ The answer: It depends! Usually no, but maybe sometimes yes. @strengthcoachtherapy explains below, and I agree with every word. . πŸ€” Lifting to failure is 100% not necessary for gainz and progress. If done too much, it can even hinder progress. For many novice lifters, going to failure is overused and overrated. Sorry bro, but you don't need to scour the gym looking for a spot for every bench press set. Just lift. . ❌ For compound lifts, missing reps can be downright dangerous (squat, bench, deadlift). This is when training injuries happen. Going to failure is much safer when you are performing single joint exercises. Examples include hamstring curls, machine work, lateral raises, arms, etc. These are low risk movements and failing can be helpful to tax smaller muscle groups. . βœ… Failing reps and pushing it to the limit can be be helpful for hypertrophy work and creating maximal oxidative stress. It's also sometimes necessary for power and oly lifters to truly find and push their max. Overall, it is still more advised for bodybuilding techniques. Failing should also be used less frequently as you get stronger and closer to your genetic potential. . πŸ€“ Smart training is all about weighing cost versus benefit. Even if you can get away with failing now, it has the potential to cause problems down the road. (Looking at you, young lifters). Furthermore, lifting to your 1 rep maximum on a weekly basis is not a wise way to structure your training. Try a reps day, a light day, and a heavy day, instead of putting all 3 into everyday. . πŸ™…πŸ½β€β™‚οΈ Lifelong gains are made by maximizing reward and minimizing risk. It's a marathon, not a sprint. Don't make missing reps a habit, the benefit is minimal if any at all. Trust me my friends, you can still train hard and reach your goals by finishing your lifts. . StrengthCoachTherapy MyodetoxOrlando Myodetox
No Buts: Lifting to Failure
 Good or Bad?
 One muscle
 fiber (cell)
 One fascicle
 (bundle of
 muscle fibers)
 Connective tissue
 Muscle
 Myofibril
 Blood vessels
 and nerves
 Tendon
 @strengthcoachtherapy
 strengtt
 Myofibrils
 Striations
 Nucleus
 A review of literature
 and best practice
SHOULD YOU LIFT TO FAILURE? - πŸš€ The answer: It depends! Usually no, but maybe sometimes yes. @strengthcoachtherapy explains below, and I agree with every word. . πŸ€” Lifting to failure is 100% not necessary for gainz and progress. If done too much, it can even hinder progress. For many novice lifters, going to failure is overused and overrated. Sorry bro, but you don't need to scour the gym looking for a spot for every bench press set. Just lift. . ❌ For compound lifts, missing reps can be downright dangerous (squat, bench, deadlift). This is when training injuries happen. Going to failure is much safer when you are performing single joint exercises. Examples include hamstring curls, machine work, lateral raises, arms, etc. These are low risk movements and failing can be helpful to tax smaller muscle groups. . βœ… Failing reps and pushing it to the limit can be be helpful for hypertrophy work and creating maximal oxidative stress. It's also sometimes necessary for power and oly lifters to truly find and push their max. Overall, it is still more advised for bodybuilding techniques. Failing should also be used less frequently as you get stronger and closer to your genetic potential. . πŸ€“ Smart training is all about weighing cost versus benefit. Even if you can get away with failing now, it has the potential to cause problems down the road. (Looking at you, young lifters). Furthermore, lifting to your 1 rep maximum on a weekly basis is not a wise way to structure your training. Try a reps day, a light day, and a heavy day, instead of putting all 3 into everyday. . πŸ™…πŸ½β€β™‚οΈ Lifelong gains are made by maximizing reward and minimizing risk. It's a marathon, not a sprint. Don't make missing reps a habit, the benefit is minimal if any at all. Trust me my friends, you can still train hard and reach your goals by finishing your lifts. . StrengthCoachTherapy MyodetoxOrlando Myodetox

SHOULD YOU LIFT TO FAILURE? - πŸš€ The answer: It depends! Usually no, but maybe sometimes yes. @strengthcoachtherapy explains below, and I...