pile on
 pile on

pile on

audience
audience

audience

there
there

there

ifs
ifs

ifs

comely
comely

comely

yours
yours

yours

ons
ons

ons

personable
personable

personable

ill
ill

ill

feelings
feelings

feelings

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Children, Love, and School: EmbraceRace Yesterday at 12:00 PM embracerace Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. Equality Equity momo-de-avis: aloneindarknes7: calystarose: Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. This is something that I teach my students during the first week of school and they understand it. Eight year olds can understand this and all it costs is a box of band-aids. I have each students pretend they got hurt and need a band-aid. Children love band-aids. I ask the first one where they are hurt. If he says his finger, I put the band-aid on his finger. Then I ask the second one where they are hurt. No matter what that child says, I put the band-aid on their finger exactly like the first child. I keep doing that through the whole class. No matter where they say their pretend injury is, I do the same thing I did with the first one. After they all have band-aids in the same spot, I ask if that actually helped any of them other than the first child. I say, “Well, I helped all of you the same! You all have one band-aid!” And they’ll try to get me to understand that they were hurt somewhere else. I act like I’m just now understanding it. Then I explain, “There might be moments this year where some of you get different things because you need them differently, just like you needed a band-aid in a different spot.”  If at any time any of my students ask why one student has a different assignment, or gets taken out of the class for a subject, or gets another teacher to come in and help them throughout the year, I remind my students of the band-aids they got at the start of the school year and they stop complaining. That’s why eight year olds can understand equity.  I remember reading somewhere once “we should be speaking of equity instead of equality” and that is a principle that applies here me thinks
Children, Love, and School: EmbraceRace
 Yesterday at 12:00 PM
 embracerace
 Because treating people fairly often means treating
 them differently.
 Equality
 Equity
momo-de-avis:
aloneindarknes7:

calystarose:
Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently.
This is something that I teach my students during the first week of school and they understand it. Eight year olds can understand this and all it costs is a box of band-aids.
I have each students pretend they got hurt and need a band-aid. Children love band-aids. I ask the first one where they are hurt. If he says his finger, I put the band-aid on his finger. Then I ask the second one where they are hurt. No matter what that child says, I put the band-aid on their finger exactly like the first child. I keep doing that through the whole class. No matter where they say their pretend injury is, I do the same thing I did with the first one.
After they all have band-aids in the same spot, I ask if that actually helped any of them other than the first child. I say, “Well, I helped all of you the same! You all have one band-aid!” And they’ll try to get me to understand that they were hurt somewhere else. I act like I’m just now understanding it. Then I explain, “There might be moments this year where some of you get different things because you need them differently, just like you needed a band-aid in a different spot.” 
If at any time any of my students ask why one student has a different assignment, or gets taken out of the class for a subject, or gets another teacher to come in and help them throughout the year, I remind my students of the band-aids they got at the start of the school year and they stop complaining. That’s why eight year olds can understand equity. 


I remember reading somewhere once “we should be speaking of equity instead of equality” and that is a principle that applies here me thinks

momo-de-avis: aloneindarknes7: calystarose: Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. This is something that I ...

Children, Growing Up, and Lenny: C humansofnewyork: “Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living check to check.  At the time we were staying in the projects with my mother-in-law, but my kids were growing up, so we needed our own place.  But all the rental brokers wanted to see our bank statements.  And we had no savings.  We didn’t even have accounts.  Then one day I was walking down the avenue, and I saw a super fixing up an empty apartment.  I told him I needed to speak to the landlord directly.  No brokers.  And I guess he liked my vibe, because he gave me the name: Ronald Petrowski.  When I called Mr. Petrowski, I explained everything.  I told him we needed a chance.  He agreed to meet me and my husband at Lenny’s Pizzeria.  He bought us a plain pie and listened to our story.  He’d grown up poor himself, so he knew the struggle.  And he gave us a chance.  We’ve been in that apartment for 35 years now, and I’ve paid him every cent.  We’ve fallen on hard times.  At one point I owed him an entire year of rent.  But he was so gracious.  He never sent us an eviction notice.  Every time he came to collect, he’d sit at our kitchen table, have a cup of coffee, and listen to our situation.  Mr. Petrowski is my hero.  He sold the building a couple years ago, but we still keep in touch.  That man gave me a home to raise my children.”
Children, Growing Up, and Lenny: C
humansofnewyork:

“Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living check to check.  At the time we were staying in the projects with my mother-in-law, but my kids were growing up, so we needed our own place.  But all the rental brokers wanted to see our bank statements.  And we had no savings.  We didn’t even have accounts.  Then one day I was walking down the avenue, and I saw a super fixing up an empty apartment.  I told him I needed to speak to the landlord directly.  No brokers.  And I guess he liked my vibe, because he gave me the name: Ronald Petrowski.  When I called Mr. Petrowski, I explained everything.  I told him we needed a chance.  He agreed to meet me and my husband at Lenny’s Pizzeria.  He bought us a plain pie and listened to our story.  He’d grown up poor himself, so he knew the struggle.  And he gave us a chance.  We’ve been in that apartment for 35 years now, and I’ve paid him every cent.  We’ve fallen on hard times.  At one point I owed him an entire year of rent.  But he was so gracious.  He never sent us an eviction notice.  Every time he came to collect, he’d sit at our kitchen table, have a cup of coffee, and listen to our situation.  Mr. Petrowski is my hero.  He sold the building a couple years ago, but we still keep in touch.  That man gave me a home to raise my children.”

humansofnewyork: “Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living check...

Ass, Children, and Dumb: 21 hrs Dear People Older Than Me: Shut up about the fucking participation trophies. We didn't ask for them. We didn't want them. We didn't cherish them and polish them while thinking about what special, gifted children we are. They were annoying clutter on our shelves that we had to throw out in secret so we wouldn't hurt YOUR feelings. And if we knew back then that you were gonna bring it up every time you disagreed with someone under 40 for the rest of fucking time, we would have told you where to shove that cheap plastic statue. Sincerely, People Younger Than Me Like -Comment →Share nt ◆ Share 214 133 shares 23 Comments straightouttanarnia: aproposthessaly: pearlsthatwereeyes: mihrsuri: star-anise: goshawke: hannibal-and-dory: pinkrocksugar: adramofpoison: children aren’t dumb. we knew that trophies meant nothing when everyone in the fucking class got one Also who was giving out those fucking trophies? SPOILER ALERT IT WASN’T US. IT WAS YOU. Who the fuck got trophies?? I got a piece of paper saying Participation on it with a cheap-ass shiny sticker in the corner! Sometimes they were ribbons. Sometimes they were just the gnawing awareness that you could never trust any praise an adult gave you. ^^^^ When I was in 7th grade, the administration at my middle school decided to make a bunch of changes to pep rallies, including changing the spirit award to the grade that showed the most school spirit to three spirit awards SO THAT EACH GRADE COULD HAVE ONE. We decided in about 2.5 seconds that this was fucking stupid and that it was pointless to have a school-wide spirit contest IF NO ONE WAS ACTUALLY ABLE TO WIN. Our entire grade organized ourselves and boycotted the pep rally in protest. We still went to the pep rally, but the entire 7th grade sat quietly in the bleachers and refused to cheer or otherwise participate. AND IT INFURIATED THE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. INFURIATED THEM. They ended up giving one spirit award to the 8th grade and two spirit awards to the 6th grade. At which point, our entire grade stood up and cheered, and the principal screamed into her microphone that we needed to sit down and stop cheering. Because we hadn’t broken any school rules, the administration realized they couldn’t punish us, and they changed back to one spirit award and got rid of the other unpopular pep rally changes. But they never forgave us. The principal saved up all of her anger for a year and a half and then called a special “promotion ceremony rehearsal” for our grade right before we graduated from middle school specifically so that she could spend an hour yelling at us about how THIS WAS NOT FOR US, THIS WAS FOR OUR PARENTS AND OUR TEACHERS AND THE ADMINISTRATION AND THE SCHOOL, AND IF WE FUCKED THE CEREMONY UP IN ANY WAY, SO HELP HER, SHE WOULD MAKE OUR LIVES A LIVING HELL.  So, yeah, tell me again about how my generation expects trophies for participating. I dare you. Someone somewhere has a great post about how all Millennials learned from this “everybody gets a trophy” culture foisted on us was to distrust conventional feedback methods (if everybody gets one, the system must be wrong and someone who tells me I’m good at something is probably lying). So the fact that we’re a generation filled with insecure overachievers with a well-documented lack of interest in conventional life markers is partly due to all those stupid participation trophies. Ruined a perfectly good kid that’s what you did. Look at it. It’s got anxiety
Ass, Children, and Dumb: 21 hrs
 Dear People Older Than Me:
 Shut up about the fucking participation trophies. We didn't ask for them. We
 didn't want them. We didn't cherish them and polish them while thinking
 about what special, gifted children we are. They were annoying clutter on our
 shelves that we had to throw out in secret so we wouldn't hurt YOUR
 feelings. And if we knew back then that you were gonna bring it up every
 time you disagreed with someone under 40 for the rest of fucking time, we
 would have told you where to shove that cheap plastic statue.
 Sincerely,
 People Younger Than Me
 Like -Comment →Share
 nt
 ◆ Share
 214
 133 shares
 23 Comments
straightouttanarnia:

aproposthessaly:

pearlsthatwereeyes:

mihrsuri:

star-anise:


goshawke:

hannibal-and-dory:

pinkrocksugar:


adramofpoison:
children aren’t dumb. we knew that trophies meant nothing when everyone in the fucking class got one

Also who was giving out those fucking trophies? SPOILER ALERT IT WASN’T US. IT WAS YOU.


Who the fuck got trophies?? I got a piece of paper saying Participation on it with a cheap-ass shiny sticker in the corner!

Sometimes they were ribbons.

Sometimes they were just the gnawing awareness that you could never trust any praise an adult gave you.


^^^^

When I was in 7th grade, the administration at my middle school decided to make a bunch of changes to pep rallies, including changing the spirit award to the grade that showed the most school spirit to three spirit awards SO THAT EACH GRADE COULD HAVE ONE.
We decided in about 2.5 seconds that this was fucking stupid and that it was pointless to have a school-wide spirit contest IF NO ONE WAS ACTUALLY ABLE TO WIN. Our entire grade organized ourselves and boycotted the pep rally in protest. We still went to the pep rally, but the entire 7th grade sat quietly in the bleachers and refused to cheer or otherwise participate.
AND IT INFURIATED THE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. INFURIATED THEM.
They ended up giving one spirit award to the 8th grade and two spirit awards to the 6th grade. At which point, our entire grade stood up and cheered, and the principal screamed into her microphone that we needed to sit down and stop cheering.
Because we hadn’t broken any school rules, the administration realized they couldn’t punish us, and they changed back to one spirit award and got rid of the other unpopular pep rally changes. But they never forgave us. The principal saved up all of her anger for a year and a half and then called a special “promotion ceremony rehearsal” for our grade right before we graduated from middle school specifically so that she could spend an hour yelling at us about how THIS WAS NOT FOR US, THIS WAS FOR OUR PARENTS AND OUR TEACHERS AND THE ADMINISTRATION AND THE SCHOOL, AND IF WE FUCKED THE CEREMONY UP IN ANY WAY, SO HELP HER, SHE WOULD MAKE OUR LIVES A LIVING HELL. 
So, yeah, tell me again about how my generation expects trophies for participating. I dare you.

Someone somewhere has a great post about how all Millennials learned from this “everybody gets a trophy” culture foisted on us was to distrust conventional feedback methods (if everybody gets one, the system must be wrong and someone who tells me I’m good at something is probably lying). So the fact that we’re a generation filled with insecure overachievers with a well-documented lack of interest in conventional life markers is partly due to all those stupid participation trophies. 

Ruined a perfectly good kid that’s what you did. Look at it. It’s got anxiety

straightouttanarnia: aproposthessaly: pearlsthatwereeyes: mihrsuri: star-anise: goshawke: hannibal-and-dory: pinkrocksugar: adramo...

Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d My children will get "privacy" from me when they can pay their own bills and feed themselves. Until then, you do what I say Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends. t 394 687 1,171 Mermaid Hofessional @StarStuffSister Replying to @TheTrillAC I haven't spoken to my mother in ten years. Welcome to your future. 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android marzipanandminutiae: greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. meanwhile, my parents… password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission regularly checked our internet browsing history shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them. your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights. nothing in this world teaches you to lie and sneak around like a parent who doesn’t believe you should have privacy
Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d
 My children will get "privacy" from me
 when they can pay their own bills and
 feed themselves. Until then, you do what I
 say
 Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends.
 t 394
 687
 1,171
 Mermaid Hofessional
 @StarStuffSister
 Replying to @TheTrillAC
 I haven't spoken to my mother in
 ten years.
 Welcome to your future.
 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android
marzipanandminutiae:

greysonderulo:
dragonsspire:


knight-nick:
If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. 
Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. 
I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. 
As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. 
I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation  we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. 
I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. 


meanwhile, my parents…
password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it
put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission
regularly checked our internet browsing history
shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework
did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities
in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them.
your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.

nothing in this world teaches you to lie and sneak around like a parent who doesn’t believe you should have privacy

marzipanandminutiae: greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my paren...

Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d My children will get "privacy" from me when they can pay their own bills and feed themselves. Until then, you do what I say Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends. t 394 687 1,171 Mermaid Hofessional @StarStuffSister Replying to @TheTrillAC I haven't spoken to my mother in ten years. Welcome to your future. 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. meanwhile, my parents… password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission regularly checked our internet browsing history shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them. your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.
Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d
 My children will get "privacy" from me
 when they can pay their own bills and
 feed themselves. Until then, you do what I
 say
 Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends.
 t 394
 687
 1,171
 Mermaid Hofessional
 @StarStuffSister
 Replying to @TheTrillAC
 I haven't spoken to my mother in
 ten years.
 Welcome to your future.
 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android
greysonderulo:
dragonsspire:


knight-nick:
If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. 
Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. 
I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. 
As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. 
I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation  we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. 
I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. 


meanwhile, my parents…
password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it
put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission
regularly checked our internet browsing history
shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework
did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities
in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them.
your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.

greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on...

Life, Shit, and Teacher: votgs lady-feral "The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality. His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: 50 pounds of pots rated an "A", 40 pounds a "B", and so on Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only one pot albeit a perfect one to get an "A" Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles of work-and learning from their mistakes the "quality" group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay." Art and Fear- David Bayles and Ted Orland (via qweety) Perfection is intimidating. I think most artists blocks come from the fear of creating something imperfect. (via buttastic) putting it even more simply: just make shit. eventually itl be good shit. maybe most of it will just be shit but you can't make good shit if you're not making a lot of shit. GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS. (via aintgotnoladytronblues) Kind of important. Ive spent way too much of my life thinking about the perfect things I could make without actually making the damned things. 26,336 notes
Life, Shit, and Teacher: votgs lady-feral
 "The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing
 the class into two groups.
 All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely
 on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on
 its quality.
 His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in
 his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: 50
 pounds of pots rated an "A", 40 pounds a "B", and so on
 Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only
 one pot albeit a perfect one to get an "A"
 Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of
 highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for
 quantity
 It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles
 of work-and learning from their mistakes the "quality" group had
 sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show
 for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay."
 Art and Fear- David Bayles and Ted Orland (via qweety)
 Perfection is intimidating. I think most artists blocks come from the fear of
 creating something imperfect.
 (via buttastic)
 putting it even more simply: just make shit. eventually itl be good shit.
 maybe most of it will just be shit but you can't make good shit if you're not
 making a lot of shit.
 GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS.
 (via aintgotnoladytronblues)
 Kind of important. Ive spent way too much of my life thinking about the
 perfect things I could make without actually making the damned things.
 26,336 notes