Resist
Resist

Resist

With
With

With

Trumped
Trumped

Trumped

And
And

And

Combate
Combate

Combate

Too Badly
Too Badly

Too Badly

Takeing
Takeing

Takeing

point
point

point

out
out

out

beautifull
 beautifull

beautifull

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Népotisme: This is what school uniforms looked like in Somalia in 1978 aC @chakabars Despite their noteworthy accomplishments, the educational reforms of the 1970s were not sustained into the 1980s. Like many other popu- lar programs from the early Siyaad era, mass education fell victim to the regime’s preoccupation with natural disasters, war with Ethiopia, and the subsequent refugee crisis. Increasing corruption and nepotism in all agencies of government (including the Ministry of Education) drained resources and enthusiasm from the schools, the teachers, and their pupils. It is instructive to examine what occurred in a few areas of educational and cultural life after 1975, as illustrations of what can go wrong when education is marginalized. • The severe drought of 1973–75 burdened the government with the responsibility of providing food and shelter for the afflicted rural population, but also provided an opportunity to bring education to the countryside. Teachers and high school students were sent out to work with displaced nomads who had been resettled in farm- ing and fishing villages, introducing large numbers of them to the new Somali script for the first time. However, shortages of relevant instructional materials and the nomads’ propensity to abandon their schooling in order to rebuild their herds or to seek out more lucra- tive employment in the Gulf soon eroded the gains of the Rural Lit- eracy Campaign. Mass rural education stagnated in the 1980s. From an (admittedly exaggerated) estimate of 70% rural literacy in 1975, United Nations’ estimates placed the literacy rate at about 25% in 1990, on the eve of the state’s collapse. • While the socialism-inspired reforms of the 1970s won guarded praise from many secular observers, they also alienated some of the country’s important religious leaders. Many of the latter had opposed the government’s choice of Latin script (rather than Arabic) for writing Somali and claimed that “Latiin waa la diin” (Latin is godless). Islamic educators were suspicious that “socialist” educa- tion paid insufficient attention to religion, and that new laws giving women equal inheritance and divorce rights would undermine the traditional authority of the Sharia courts. chakabars lovearmyforsomalia
Népotisme: This is what school uniforms looked like in
 Somalia in 1978
 aC
 @chakabars
Despite their noteworthy accomplishments, the educational reforms of the 1970s were not sustained into the 1980s. Like many other popu- lar programs from the early Siyaad era, mass education fell victim to the regime’s preoccupation with natural disasters, war with Ethiopia, and the subsequent refugee crisis. Increasing corruption and nepotism in all agencies of government (including the Ministry of Education) drained resources and enthusiasm from the schools, the teachers, and their pupils. It is instructive to examine what occurred in a few areas of educational and cultural life after 1975, as illustrations of what can go wrong when education is marginalized. • The severe drought of 1973–75 burdened the government with the responsibility of providing food and shelter for the afflicted rural population, but also provided an opportunity to bring education to the countryside. Teachers and high school students were sent out to work with displaced nomads who had been resettled in farm- ing and fishing villages, introducing large numbers of them to the new Somali script for the first time. However, shortages of relevant instructional materials and the nomads’ propensity to abandon their schooling in order to rebuild their herds or to seek out more lucra- tive employment in the Gulf soon eroded the gains of the Rural Lit- eracy Campaign. Mass rural education stagnated in the 1980s. From an (admittedly exaggerated) estimate of 70% rural literacy in 1975, United Nations’ estimates placed the literacy rate at about 25% in 1990, on the eve of the state’s collapse. • While the socialism-inspired reforms of the 1970s won guarded praise from many secular observers, they also alienated some of the country’s important religious leaders. Many of the latter had opposed the government’s choice of Latin script (rather than Arabic) for writing Somali and claimed that “Latiin waa la diin” (Latin is godless). Islamic educators were suspicious that “socialist” educa- tion paid insufficient attention to religion, and that new laws giving women equal inheritance and divorce rights would undermine the traditional authority of the Sharia courts. chakabars lovearmyforsomalia

Despite their noteworthy accomplishments, the educational reforms of the 1970s were not sustained into the 1980s. Like many other popu- l...