Museum
Museum

Museum

Are
Are

Are

Took
Took

Took

The
The

The

And
And

And

Memeing
Memeing

Memeing

this morning
 this morning

this morning

my favorite
 my favorite

my favorite

no comment
 no comment

no comment

earings
 earings

earings

🔥 | Latest

Museums: Dracovish - Water / Dragon-type Arctovish -Water / Ice-type IGN IGN Dracozolt -Electric / Dragon-type Arctozolt - Electic / Ice-type IGN IGN spacehippieface: girlfriendluvr: tsunflowers: why are these all so fucked up the fossil pokemon of this gen are inspired by several incidents in britain (and europe at large but mostly britain) where many fossils were put together completely wrong, resulting in shit like this being in actual museums. this particular one (the “otto von guerick unicorn”) is actually from germany, but it’s the funniest of them. see the crystal palace dinosaurs or the piltdown man for british examples in the game, you’re combining fossils from completely different extinct pokemon, resulting in these monstrosities that have dex entries like this: “Its mighty legs are capable of running at speeds exceeding 40 mph, but this Pokémon can’t breathe unless it’s underwater.“ “The shaking of its freezing upper half is what generates its electricity. It has a hard time walking around.“ “Though it’s able to capture prey by freezing its surroundings, it has trouble eating the prey afterward because its mouth is on top of its head.“ some of the 8 dex entries even speculate why these pokemon may have gone extinct, which is funny because they never existed in the first place. they’re chimeras that are exclusive to the pokemon universe’s modern times. the professor lady who puts the fossils together in the pokemon games is even named Cara Liss (careless) some people have made fanart of what the original pokemon may have looked like, here’s one, here’s another, and here’s a third!
Museums: Dracovish - Water / Dragon-type
 Arctovish -Water / Ice-type
 IGN
 IGN
 Dracozolt -Electric / Dragon-type
 Arctozolt - Electic / Ice-type
 IGN
 IGN
spacehippieface:

girlfriendluvr:

tsunflowers:
why are these all so fucked up
the fossil pokemon of this gen are inspired by several incidents in britain (and europe at large but mostly britain) where many fossils were put together completely wrong, resulting in shit like this being in actual museums. this particular one (the “otto von guerick unicorn”) is actually from germany, but it’s the funniest of them. see the crystal palace dinosaurs or the piltdown man for british examples
in the game, you’re combining fossils from completely different extinct pokemon, resulting in these monstrosities that have dex entries like this:
“Its mighty legs are capable of running at speeds exceeding 40 mph, but this Pokémon can’t breathe unless it’s underwater.“
“The shaking of its freezing upper half is what generates its electricity. It has a hard time walking around.“
“Though it’s able to capture prey by freezing its surroundings, it has trouble eating the prey afterward because its mouth is on top of its head.“
some of the 8 dex entries even speculate why these pokemon may have gone extinct, which is funny because they never existed in the first place. they’re chimeras that are exclusive to the pokemon universe’s modern times.
the professor lady who puts the fossils together in the pokemon games is even named Cara Liss (careless)
some people have made fanart of what the original pokemon may have looked like, here’s one, here’s another, and here’s a third!

spacehippieface: girlfriendluvr: tsunflowers: why are these all so fucked up the fossil pokemon of this gen are inspired by several inc...

Museums: Pixelated Boat @pixelatedboat 12h Replying to @pixelatedboat FYI, if you're wondering how Germany commemorates Hitler, this is the spot where he died: garlic-slut: withywindlesdaughter: imagesofperfection: gtfomulder: nichtschwert: irishfino: ithelpstodream: “it’s just a parking lot” exactly. there’s nothing there. not a statue. not a plaque. nothing. [drives over hitler’s death site] Bloody amazing. And you know what’s right next to it? That’s right, the Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden, which translates to the Memorial for the murdered jews. So if you wanna go have a look at the monument commemorating the victims of Hitler’s regime, you can park your car right on the spot he died and walk there. Makes ya think, doesn’t it? Germany: *has a literal parking lot over Hitler’s death site and has the memorial for the murdered Jews right next to it* America: *has statues and museums dedicated to people who believed slavery was so amazing and good they decided to make their own country and murder anyone who disagreed* Women, the streets near the car park are named after: Gertrud Kolmar - German Jewish poet murdered in Auschwitz Hannah Arendt - famous German Jewish philosopher and author, her works on totalitarianism, authority and the nature of power, who fled Nazi Germany in 1933 Cora Berliner - German Jewish economist and social scientist murdered in Trostinets extermination camp reblog this forever  It’s funny too cause people argue that you “can’t erase history” and that’s true. You can, however; choose how you commemorate it. I hope this Bastard is burning in hell while also being extremely pissed off because of all this.Fuck you Hitler.
Museums: Pixelated Boat @pixelatedboat 12h
 Replying to @pixelatedboat
 FYI, if you're wondering how Germany commemorates Hitler, this is the spot
 where he died:
garlic-slut:
withywindlesdaughter:

imagesofperfection:

gtfomulder:

nichtschwert:

irishfino:

ithelpstodream:

“it’s just a parking lot”

exactly. there’s nothing there. not a statue. not a plaque. nothing.


[drives over hitler’s death site]

Bloody amazing.
And you know what’s right next to it?
That’s right, the Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden, which translates to the Memorial for the murdered jews.
So if you wanna go have a look at the monument commemorating the victims of Hitler’s regime, you can park your car right on the spot he died and walk there.
Makes ya think, doesn’t it?


Germany: *has a literal parking lot over Hitler’s death site and has the memorial for the murdered Jews right next to it*
America: *has statues and museums dedicated to people who believed slavery was so amazing and good they decided to make their own country and murder anyone who disagreed*

Women, the streets near the car park are named after:
Gertrud Kolmar - German Jewish poet murdered in Auschwitz
Hannah Arendt - famous German Jewish philosopher and author, her works on totalitarianism, authority and the nature of power, who fled Nazi Germany in 1933
Cora Berliner - German Jewish economist and social scientist murdered in 
Trostinets extermination camp



reblog this forever 


It’s funny too cause people argue that you “can’t erase history” and that’s true. You can, however; choose how you commemorate it.


I hope this Bastard is burning in hell while also being extremely pissed off because of all this.Fuck you Hitler.

garlic-slut: withywindlesdaughter: imagesofperfection: gtfomulder: nichtschwert: irishfino: ithelpstodream: “it’s just a parking lo...

Museums: did you know? Harvard has a pigment library thait stores old pigment sources, like the ground shells of now-extinct insects poisonous metals, and wrappings from Egyptian mummies, to preserve the origins of the world's rarest colors. 2109 cr Green 1003* #1065 1067 ed Oxide ellow Oohre 897 Tellow Oahre talio s Coulston, Reichard Coula PHOTO: HARVARD ART MUSEUMS/FASTCODESIGN DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM re-pu-ta-tion: zigster-ao3: did-you-kno: Harvard has a pigment library that stores old pigment sources, like the ground shells of now-extinct insects, poisonous metals, and wrappings from Egyptian mummies, to preserve the origins of the world’s rarest colors. A few centuries ago, finding a specific color might have meant trekking across the globe to a mineral deposit in the middle of Afghanistan. “Every pigment has its own story,” Narayan Khandekar, the caretaker of the pigment collection, told Fastcodesign. He also shared the stories of some of the most interesting pigments in the collection. Mummy Brown “People would harvest mummies from Egypt and then extract the brown resin material that was on the wrappings around the bodies and turn that into a pigment. It’s a very bizarre kind of pigment, I’ve got to say, but it was very popular in the 18th and 19th centuries.” Cadmium Yellow “Cadmium yellow was introduced in the mid 19th century. It’s a bright yellow that many impressionists used. Cadmium is a heavy metal, very toxic. In the early 20th century, cadmium red was introduced. You find these pigments used in industrial processes. Up until the 1970s, Lego bricks had cadmium pigment in them.” Annatto“The lipstick plant—a small tree, Bixa orellana, native to Central and South America—produces annatto, a natural orange dye. Seeds from the plant are contained in a pod surrounded with a bright red pulp. Currently, annatto is used to color butter, cheese, and cosmetics.” Lapis Lazuli“People would mine it in Afghanistan, ship it across Europe, and it was more expensive than gold so it would have its own budget line on a commission.” Dragon’s Blood“It has a great name, but it’s not from dragons. [The bright red pigment] is from the rattan palm.” Cochineal“This red dye comes from squashed beetles, and it’s used in cosmetics and food.” Emerald Green “This is made from copper acetoarsenite. We had a Van Gogh with a bright green background that was identified as emerald green. Pigments used for artists’ purposes can find their way into use in other areas as well. Emerald green was used as an insecticide, and you often see it on older wood that would be put into the ground, like railroad ties.” Source This is pure alchemy. I love it!  If you know how much I love colors you know how much I’m freaking out right now. I WANT TO BE THERE
Museums: did you know?
 Harvard has a pigment library thait
 stores old pigment sources, like the
 ground shells of now-extinct insects
 poisonous metals, and wrappings from
 Egyptian mummies, to preserve the
 origins of the world's rarest colors.
 2109
 cr Green
 1003*
 #1065
 1067
 ed Oxide
 ellow Oohre
 897
 Tellow Oahre
 talio s
 Coulston,
 Reichard Coula
 PHOTO: HARVARD ART MUSEUMS/FASTCODESIGN
 DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM
re-pu-ta-tion:
zigster-ao3:

did-you-kno:

Harvard has a pigment library that 
stores old pigment sources, like the 
ground shells of now-extinct insects, 
poisonous metals, and wrappings from 
Egyptian mummies, to preserve the 
origins of the world’s rarest colors.
A few centuries ago, finding a specific color might have meant trekking across the globe to a mineral deposit in the middle of Afghanistan. “Every pigment has its own story,” Narayan Khandekar, the caretaker of the pigment collection, told Fastcodesign. He also shared the stories of some of the most interesting pigments in the collection.





Mummy Brown
“People would harvest mummies from Egypt and then extract the brown resin material that was on the wrappings around the bodies and turn that into a pigment. It’s a very bizarre kind of pigment, I’ve got to say, but it was very popular in the 18th and 19th centuries.”




Cadmium Yellow

“Cadmium yellow was introduced in the mid 19th century. It’s a bright yellow that many impressionists used. Cadmium is a heavy metal, very toxic. In the early 20th century, cadmium red was introduced. You find these pigments used in industrial processes. Up until the 1970s, Lego bricks had cadmium pigment in them.” 


Annatto“The lipstick plant—a small tree, Bixa orellana, native to Central and South America—produces annatto, a natural orange dye. Seeds from the plant are contained in a pod surrounded with a bright red pulp. Currently, annatto is used to color butter, cheese, and cosmetics.”
Lapis Lazuli“People would mine it in Afghanistan, ship it across Europe, and it was more expensive than gold so it would have its own budget line on a commission.”
Dragon’s Blood“It has a great name, but it’s not from dragons. [The bright red pigment] is from the rattan palm.”
Cochineal“This red dye comes from squashed beetles, and it’s used in cosmetics and food.”
Emerald Green “This is made from copper acetoarsenite. We had a Van Gogh with a bright green background that was identified as emerald green. Pigments used for artists’ purposes can find their way into use in other areas as well. Emerald green was used as an insecticide, and you often see it on older wood that would be put into the ground, like railroad ties.”
Source

This is pure alchemy. I love it! 


If you know how much I love colors you know how much I’m freaking out right now. I WANT TO BE THERE

re-pu-ta-tion: zigster-ao3: did-you-kno: Harvard has a pigment library that stores old pigment sources, like the ground shells of now...

Museums: Close enough Pretty good! Talk about making museums fun! Hooray for art!
Museums: Close enough
Pretty good! Talk about making museums fun! Hooray for art!

Pretty good! Talk about making museums fun! Hooray for art!