comely
comely

comely

ons
ons

ons

closely
closely

closely

playful
playful

playful

played
played

played

how did
how did

how did

mourning dove
mourning dove

mourning dove

toxic
toxic

toxic

withings
withings

withings

gorillas
gorillas

gorillas

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mourning: awesomage:Sad Mourning Songs - Crying Yourself to Sleep Spotify Playlist
mourning: awesomage:Sad Mourning Songs - Crying Yourself to Sleep Spotify Playlist

awesomage:Sad Mourning Songs - Crying Yourself to Sleep Spotify Playlist

mourning: awesomage:Sad Mourning Songs - Crying Yourself to Sleep Spotify Playlist
mourning: awesomage:Sad Mourning Songs - Crying Yourself to Sleep Spotify Playlist

awesomage:Sad Mourning Songs - Crying Yourself to Sleep Spotify Playlist

mourning: omgcheckplease: ★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergraduate at Yale. One of the college’s traditional songs—which they strategically have students sing during their first weeks as Yalies and then again at the moment we’re conferred our degrees—goes like this:Bright College years, with pleasure rife,The shortest, gladdest years of life;How swiftly are ye gliding by!Oh, why doth time so quickly fly?Et cetera. The first time you sing it, you mumble the words and don’t know a single person around you. The last time you sing it, wearing the mortarboard and gown, you’ve got the lyrics memorized and you’re surrounded by some of the most important people in your life.That summer, with “How bright will seem, through mem’ry’s haze/ Those happy, golden, bygone days!” still ringing in my ears, I started CHECK, PLEASE. The comic’s first panels emerged on an ancient laptop, through a borrowed bamboo tablet, and on a free drawing program called gnu-IMPShop. I had no plan. I wanted to explore my newfound fascination with hockey and share silly cartoons on Tumblr. But unconsciously, I also wanted to pour the nostalgia of those bright college years into the Haus, Faber, Samwell, and Bitty’s story. I wanted to bottle up those moments where we grow and change and fall down and pick ourselves back up. Drawing CHECK, PLEASE was how I revisited those experiences and how I sifted through the bittersweet feeling of concluding something I loved. Perhaps this is why finishing CHECK, PLEASE calls back those same emotions. Just as Bitty would bake affection into a pie, I might have encoded into CHECK, PLEASE the heartfelt fondness I had for my time in college, the love of the friends I made there, and the gratitude I have for my own growth.I have always found it easier to express gratitude face to face. And even though I would not have gotten to meet all of you, the greatest downside of being unable to participate in a book tour is that I can’t say thanks in person. I could write a thousand words, yet they couldn’t replace a high five at a bookstore signing or a handshake at a convention. I could write the blog post to end all blog posts, but it’s not the same as yelling with you about an episode or chatting about a fandom we both happen be in. For me, it’s those moments that somehow equate to my abundant appreciation for you, the reader.I look forward to the day when I can let my actions speak louder than my words!In the meantime: thank you. I am incredibly blessed to get to create a story and then share it. This is all I want to do in life. These characters get to have a readership overflowing with love and enthusiasm for them. This comic, somehow, has found ambassadors. This story gets to be told. Thank you! I’m excited to share with you the unusual, fun, and hopeful narratives I’m working hard to develop.So with that, I’ll sign off on the last blog post! Thank you for reading this comic. Thank you for sharing it with friends. Thank you for caring about Bitty’s story and CHECK, PLEASE.Thank you!John J. Johnson.Just kidding, it’s Ngozi. :^) Tee hee. Bye now!
mourning: omgcheckplease:

★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergraduate at Yale. One of the college’s traditional songs—which they strategically have students sing during their first weeks as Yalies and then again at the moment we’re conferred our degrees—goes like this:Bright College years, with pleasure rife,The shortest, gladdest years of life;How swiftly are ye gliding by!Oh, why doth time so quickly fly?Et cetera. The first time you sing it, you mumble the words and don’t know a single person around you. The last time you sing it, wearing the mortarboard and gown, you’ve got the lyrics memorized and you’re surrounded by some of the most important people in your life.That summer, with “How bright will seem, through mem’ry’s haze/ Those happy, golden, bygone days!” still ringing in my ears, I started CHECK, PLEASE. The comic’s first panels emerged on an ancient laptop, through a borrowed bamboo tablet, and on a free drawing program called gnu-IMPShop. I had no plan. I wanted to explore my newfound fascination with hockey and share silly cartoons on Tumblr. But unconsciously, I also wanted to pour the nostalgia of those bright college years into the Haus, Faber, Samwell, and Bitty’s story. I wanted to bottle up those moments where we grow and change and fall down and pick ourselves back up. Drawing CHECK, PLEASE was how I revisited those experiences and how I sifted through the bittersweet feeling of concluding something I loved. Perhaps this is why finishing CHECK, PLEASE calls back those same emotions. Just as Bitty would bake affection into a pie, I might have encoded into CHECK, PLEASE the heartfelt fondness I had for my time in college, the love of the friends I made there, and the gratitude I have for my own growth.I have always found it easier to express gratitude face to face. And even though I would not have gotten to meet all of you, the greatest downside of being unable to participate in a book tour is that I can’t say thanks in person. I could write a thousand words, yet they couldn’t replace a high five at a bookstore signing or a handshake at a convention. I could write the blog post to end all blog posts, but it’s not the same as yelling with you about an episode or chatting about a fandom we both happen be in. For me, it’s those moments that somehow equate to my abundant appreciation for you, the reader.I look forward to the day when I can let my actions speak louder than my words!In the meantime: thank you. I am incredibly blessed to get to create a story and then share it. This is all I want to do in life. These characters get to have a readership overflowing with love and enthusiasm for them. This comic, somehow, has found ambassadors. This story gets to be told. Thank you! I’m excited to share with you the unusual, fun, and hopeful narratives I’m working hard to develop.So with that, I’ll sign off on the last blog post! Thank you for reading this comic. Thank you for sharing it with friends. Thank you for caring about Bitty’s story and CHECK, PLEASE.Thank you!John J. Johnson.Just kidding, it’s Ngozi. :^) Tee hee. Bye now!

omgcheckplease: ★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergr...

mourning: chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep Spotify playlist 
mourning: chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep Spotify playlist 

chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep Spotify playlist 

mourning: chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep
mourning: chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep

chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep

mourning: chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep Spotify playlist
mourning: chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep Spotify playlist

chrispalmermusic:Sad Mourning 😢 Songs  Crying Yourself to sleep Spotify playlist

mourning: 61below: jyuu-chan: something-in-the-way-she-knows: freakishfrollic: psalmsofraven: yokhakidfiasco: stacyfaheyart: Illustration about Native American boys who have to cut off their braids to follow school dress codes. And black people have the same issue when it comes to finding jobs/careers. ^^^^ yes but it ain’t about us right now this is actually really important and pardon me for doing the cliche reblogging with a caption thing but i want to talk about braids and just how significant they are to native people (and of course i can’t talk about every native tribe as there are very specific sects and i only really am coming from the perspective of seneca) hair is extremely important as it represents the walking of the Sacred Path as the physical extension of thought and self, and holy men, women and two-spirits are identified through specific styles of dress and even if not holy, the hair shows what a person has participated in, their feelings, their age, whether they are married or not, whether they are in mourning and their tribe my grandfather is seneca and he had to remove his braids at a very young age and it was an act of assimilation because his mother knew they had to try to be white in order to proceed and it’s a tool of oppression and humiliation to cut (or force to cut) a native american person’s hair for both religious and cultural preservationist reasons my mom is half-seneca and her choice for me to not cut my hair until i was 13 and for it to be worn in traditional manner was because of this and when i cut my hair then, i cut it off at the base of my head for also this reason; i was diagnosed with depression and was going through therapy, i wanted my hair and my treatment to signify that i was becoming a new, better person– eventually i started dying my hair but that is for separate reasons of colour symbolism and it’s still an important thing to me please do not invalidate the struggles of other POC, i understand that this happens and it’s horrific to not be able to wear your natural hair, these are also children whose culture and religion is being stripped away from them and they can’t even participate in something so important within their culture simply because of white patriarchal ideas of masculinity ^^THIS American Indian children (especially plains ndns) were forced to attend boarding schools where they were forbidden to speak their own language and had to cut off their hair and choose a “white” name from the bible. If you refused, the teacher would often ridicule you by ignoring you anytime you attempted to speak or participate in class, to the point of saying offensive, false things about your people to rile you up enough that you gave in and picked a white name so the teacher would let you speak and tell the truth. (This is shown in bury my heart at wounded knee). In fact, it is hard to trace records before the turn of the 19th to 20th centuries bc the govt considered the way native peoples often have several different names that they go by in different context and by different people to be too annoying to record them in a census, another reason they were forced to choose white names. Being oppressed for your natural hair and the names you choose is a real thing other poc face and it’s wrong and it’s racist, but this specific post is about what it means to American Indians, and for them it was not only racist stereotyping, but forced assimilation and genocide of their cultures. dude holy shit being ridiculed for not assimilating was the least of your worries in a residential school. i know people who were forced to kneel on sharp rocks in a corner for speaking a single word in their native language some fun facts abt residential schools: • people who went to residential schools were abused physically, sexually, verbally, and emotionally. my mushum went through all of these until he turned 18 and was allowed to leave • boys were not allowed to wear their braids. period. the point of the residential schools was to ‘kill the indian in the child’ and you can google literal before-and-after images of students that the schools would distribute as a source of PRIDE • the government would experiment on the students, starving them to see how long they could go without food before it seriously affected them. officially, over 6,000 native children died in residential schools. our government admits the number was likely much higher • residential schools were literally hitler’s source of inspiration for concentration camps during world war II • where im working right now, there are people in their 30s who were forced to attend residential schools • the last residential school closed in 1996, one year after i was born, two hours away from where i live, twenty minutes from my family’s reserve native assimilation has been the goal from the very start Residential schools may have officially been shut down, but native kids are still disproportionately removed from their homes and while ICWA (the Indian Child Welfare Act) was designed with the intent of ensuring they’re still placed within their community, ICWA was just recently overturned in the courts, which means that these children are being overwhelmingly placed with white families. This hasn’t stopped. They’ve just gotten less overt about it.
mourning: 61below:
jyuu-chan:

something-in-the-way-she-knows:

freakishfrollic:

psalmsofraven:

yokhakidfiasco:

stacyfaheyart:

Illustration about Native American boys who have to cut off their braids to follow school dress codes.

And black people have the same issue when it comes to finding jobs/careers.

^^^^ yes but it ain’t about us right now

this is actually really important and pardon me for doing the cliche reblogging with a caption thing but i want to talk about braids and just how significant they are
to native people (and of course i can’t talk about every native tribe as there are very specific sects and i only really am coming from the perspective of seneca) hair is extremely important as it represents the walking of the Sacred Path as the physical extension of thought and self, and holy men, women and two-spirits are identified through specific styles of dress and even if not holy, the hair shows what a person has participated in, their feelings, their age, whether they are married or not, whether they are in mourning and their tribe
my grandfather is seneca and he had to remove his braids at a very young age and it was an act of assimilation because his mother knew they had to try to be white in order to proceed and it’s a tool of oppression and humiliation to cut (or force to cut) a native american person’s hair for both religious and cultural preservationist reasons
my mom is half-seneca and her choice for me to not cut my hair until i was 13 and for it to be worn in traditional manner was because of this and when i cut my hair then, i cut it off at the base of my head for also this reason; i was diagnosed with depression and was going through therapy, i wanted my hair and my treatment to signify that i was becoming a new, better person– eventually i started dying my hair but that is for separate reasons of colour symbolism and it’s still an important thing to me
please do not invalidate the struggles of other POC, i understand that this happens and it’s horrific to not be able to wear your natural hair, these are also children whose culture and religion is being stripped away from them and they can’t even participate in something so important within their culture simply because of white patriarchal ideas of masculinity

^^THIS
American Indian children (especially plains ndns) were forced to attend boarding schools where they were forbidden to speak their own language and had to cut off their hair and choose a “white” name from the bible. If you refused, the teacher would often ridicule you by ignoring you anytime you attempted to speak or participate in class, to the point of saying offensive, false things about your people to rile you up enough that you gave in and picked a white name so the teacher would let you speak and tell the truth. (This is shown in bury my heart at wounded knee). In fact, it is hard to trace records before the turn of the 19th to 20th centuries bc the govt considered the way native peoples often have several different names that they go by in different context and by different people to be too annoying to record them in a census, another reason they were forced to choose white names. 
Being oppressed for your natural hair and the names you choose is a real thing other poc face and it’s wrong and it’s racist, but this specific post is about what it means to American Indians, and for them it was not only racist stereotyping, but forced assimilation and genocide of their cultures. 

dude holy shit being ridiculed for not assimilating was the least of your worries in a residential school. i know people who were forced to kneel on sharp rocks in a corner for speaking a single word in their native language
some fun facts abt residential schools:
 • people who went to residential schools were abused physically, sexually, verbally, and emotionally. my mushum went through all of these until he turned 18 and was allowed to leave
 • boys were not allowed to wear their braids. period. the point of the residential schools was to ‘kill the indian in the child’ and you can google literal before-and-after images of students that the schools would distribute as a source of PRIDE
 • the government would experiment on the students, starving them to see how long they could go without food before it seriously affected them. officially, over 6,000 native children died in residential schools. our government admits the number was likely much higher
 • residential schools were literally hitler’s source of inspiration for concentration camps during world war II
 • where im working right now, there are people in their 30s who were forced to attend residential schools
 • the last residential school closed in 1996, one year after i was born, two hours away from where i live, twenty minutes from my family’s reserve
native assimilation has been the goal from the very start


Residential schools may have officially been shut down, but native kids are still disproportionately removed from their homes and while ICWA (the Indian Child Welfare Act) was designed with the intent of ensuring they’re still placed within their community, ICWA was just recently overturned in the courts, which means that these children are being overwhelmingly placed with white families. This hasn’t stopped. They’ve just gotten less overt about it.

61below: jyuu-chan: something-in-the-way-she-knows: freakishfrollic: psalmsofraven: yokhakidfiasco: stacyfaheyart: Illustration abo...

mourning: THES bienenkiste:“Mourning Glory”. Nathan Westling by Inez Van Lamsweerde Vinoodh Matadin for W September 2015
mourning: THES
bienenkiste:“Mourning Glory”. Nathan Westling by Inez Van Lamsweerde  Vinoodh Matadin for W September 2015

bienenkiste:“Mourning Glory”. Nathan Westling by Inez Van Lamsweerde Vinoodh Matadin for W September 2015

mourning: whotheeffisbucky: fantastic-fantasy-fanfics: whotheeffisbucky: angryschnauzer: comicbookfilms: Justice League (2017) dir. Zack Snyder Only a male director would put an upskirt shot into a movie and hope no one mentions it. @angryschnauzer RIGHT? RIGHT?!  The huge difference between the way she’s shot in the Patty Jenkins film compared to this is ridiculous. It’s framed in such a way that we could be viewing her actual vagina, but the shadowing leaves a little more to the imagination. The male gaze is alive and kicking, my friends.  I could write an entire essay about this, but this is one of the most clear cut examples I can think of.  You can’t see up her skirt? And it’s to make her look taller? More intimidating? If it was an up-skirt shot you’d see her bare ass cheeks or an implication of her vag. You can’t. Not to mention, JOSS WHEDON re-shot a lot of the scenes in Justice league (and made them worse), AND was in charge of overseeing editing while Zach was mourning his daughter. So if you’re going to blame someone, don’t blame Zach for this, blame Joss Whedon. Zach’s cut if Justice League ACTUALLY respected Diana If it was an up-skirt shot you’d see her bare ass cheeks or an implication of her vag. You can’t. Not to mention, JOSS WHEDON re-shot a lot of the scenes in Justice league (and made them worse), AND was in charge of overseeing editing while Zach was mourning his daughter. @fantastic-fantasy-fanfics That’s not the point I was making. Neither director has been mentioned at all in this post. There are alternative ways to make an individual look taller. The Dutch Shot has many uses. Example:The camera is tilted and keeps both actors in frame, whilst achieving the desired effect. What I’m arguing is wrong is the choice of angle that deliberately places Wonder Woman in a position to be looked at in a sexual manner. Moreover, an upskirt shot does not have to include any bare flesh at all. If anything, it’s designed to imply, rather than simply show. It’s not an issue with Zach Snyder, there was never any mention of him. But the issue still stands: the shot was clearly done to appease the male gaze and is needlessly oversexualised. It’s a standing problem in popular film and looks very obvious here when you compare it to how Patty Jenkins shot the Wonder Woman film.
mourning: whotheeffisbucky:

fantastic-fantasy-fanfics:
whotheeffisbucky:

angryschnauzer:

comicbookfilms:
Justice League (2017) dir. Zack Snyder

Only a male director would put an upskirt shot into a movie and hope no one mentions it. 

@angryschnauzer RIGHT? RIGHT?! 
The huge difference between the way she’s shot in the Patty Jenkins film compared to this is ridiculous. It’s framed in such a way that we could be viewing her actual vagina, but the shadowing leaves a little more to the imagination. The male gaze is alive and kicking, my friends. 
I could write an entire essay about this, but this is one of the most clear cut examples I can think of. 

You can’t see up her skirt?  And it’s to make her look taller?  More intimidating? If it was an up-skirt shot you’d see her bare ass cheeks or an implication of her vag.  You can’t.  Not to mention, JOSS WHEDON re-shot a lot of the scenes in Justice league (and made them worse), AND was in charge of overseeing editing while Zach was mourning his daughter.  So if you’re going to blame someone, don’t blame Zach for this, blame Joss Whedon.  Zach’s cut if Justice League ACTUALLY respected Diana 
If it was an up-skirt shot you’d see her bare ass cheeks or an implication of her vag.  You can’t.
Not to mention, JOSS WHEDON re-shot a lot of the scenes in Justice league (and made them worse), AND was in charge of overseeing editing while Zach was mourning his daughter.

@fantastic-fantasy-fanfics That’s not the point I was making. Neither director has been mentioned at all in this post. There are alternative ways to make an individual look taller. The Dutch Shot has many uses. Example:The camera is tilted and keeps both actors in frame, whilst achieving the desired effect. What I’m arguing is wrong is the choice of angle that deliberately places Wonder Woman in a position to be looked at in a sexual manner. Moreover, an upskirt shot does not have to include any bare flesh at all. If anything, it’s designed to imply, rather than simply show. It’s not an issue with Zach Snyder, there was never any mention of him. But the issue still stands: the shot was clearly done to appease the male gaze and is needlessly oversexualised. It’s a standing problem in popular film and looks very obvious here when you compare it to how Patty Jenkins shot the Wonder Woman film.

whotheeffisbucky: fantastic-fantasy-fanfics: whotheeffisbucky: angryschnauzer: comicbookfilms: Justice League (2017) dir. Zack Snyder...

mourning: RO NOLD RO EIN TH Irish father mourning the remains of his son during the Irish Civil War (November 20th, 1922)
mourning: RO
 NOLD
 RO
 EIN TH
Irish father mourning the remains of his son during the Irish Civil War (November 20th, 1922)

Irish father mourning the remains of his son during the Irish Civil War (November 20th, 1922)

mourning: ViralHog LAD BIBLE This guy saw a raccoon mourning the loss of his friend, this is so sad 😩❤️
mourning: ViralHog
 LAD
 BIBLE
This guy saw a raccoon mourning the loss of his friend, this is so sad 😩❤️

This guy saw a raccoon mourning the loss of his friend, this is so sad 😩❤️