1950S
1950S

1950S

joyce
 joyce

joyce

support
support

support

yours
yours

yours

dieing
dieing

dieing

the game show
the game show

the game show

deliberate
deliberate

deliberate

famous
famous

famous

evening
evening

evening

answeres
answeres

answeres

๐Ÿ”ฅ | Latest

Butt, Chill, and Choose One: Ride Menu Choose one or more types of rides you would like today (You must be 18 years of age or older and over 4'2" tall.) The Stand-Up Ride lohn: The Lyft Driver I tell you about things I learned in prison and poor life choices I have made. Don't put a tattoo of your girlfriend on your butt. It rarely works out well. The Creepy Ride I don't say anything. I just leer at you periodically in the review mirror and lick my lips in an unpleasant, malicious or lascivious manner. The Therapy Ride Tell me about all your problems and I will pretend to care The Sympathy Ride I tell you about my problems and you pretend to care The Silent Ride The Sado-Masochistic Ride l insult you and your relatives (particularly your mother) and be as rude as I possibly can to you the whole trip. WARNING: This ride hegins by me throwing yo out of the car and making you run to catch up. The Chill Out Ride out on beautifu, qwiet classical music and you arrive at your destunation relaxed, refreshed and less likely to complain about the TSA strip search. The Gluttony Ride I recommend the best restaurants in town and warn you to stay away from the other oves ayped ones. (I will join you upon request.) The Jeopardy Ride I tell you fun facts and trivia about Nashville which will help you win game shows and amaze your friends. Hint: Ask me about "hookers Interesting Lyft ride The sadomasochistic ride is tempting (xpost from r/mildlyinteresting)
Butt, Chill, and Choose One: Ride Menu
 Choose one or more types of rides you would like today
 (You must be 18 years of age or older and over 4'2" tall.)
 The Stand-Up Ride
 lohn: The Lyft Driver
 I tell you about things I learned in prison and poor life choices I have made.
 Don't put a tattoo of your girlfriend on your butt. It rarely works out well.
 The Creepy Ride
 I don't say anything. I just leer at you periodically in the review mirror and
 lick my lips in an unpleasant, malicious or lascivious manner.
 The Therapy Ride
 Tell me about all your problems and I will pretend to care
 The Sympathy Ride
 I tell you about my problems and you pretend to care
 The Silent Ride
 The Sado-Masochistic Ride
 l insult you and your relatives (particularly your mother) and be as rude as I
 possibly can to you the whole trip. WARNING: This ride hegins by me
 throwing yo out of the car and making you run to catch up.
 The Chill Out Ride
 out on beautifu, qwiet classical music and you arrive at your destunation
 relaxed, refreshed and less likely to complain about the TSA strip search.
 The Gluttony Ride
 I recommend the best restaurants in town and warn you to stay away from
 the other oves ayped ones. (I will join you upon request.)
 The Jeopardy Ride
 I tell you fun facts and trivia about Nashville which will help you win game
 shows and amaze your friends. Hint: Ask me about "hookers
 Interesting Lyft ride
The sadomasochistic ride is tempting (xpost from r/mildlyinteresting)

The sadomasochistic ride is tempting (xpost from r/mildlyinteresting)

Game, Japanese, and Game Shows: Japanese Game Shows are on a completely different level than the rest of us
Game, Japanese, and Game Shows: Japanese Game Shows are on a completely different level than the rest of us

Japanese Game Shows are on a completely different level than the rest of us

Game, Japanese, and Game Shows: Japanese Game Shows are on a completely different level than the rest of us
Game, Japanese, and Game Shows: Japanese Game Shows are on a completely different level than the rest of us

Japanese Game Shows are on a completely different level than the rest of us

Asian, Climbing, and College: ingu: marrymejasonsegel: I wrote a college paper once about gender dynamics in Disney films, and part dealt with the emphasis of androgyny in this film. Mulan is an outsider and unsure of her position of the world when she is adhering to both a total feminine role (the matchmaking scene) and a total masculine role (disguised as a male soldier) and itโ€™s only when sheโ€™s able to embrace both sides that she is able to fully showcase her abilities and ultimately save the day.ย  The entire climax, from climbing the poles using sashes, counting on Shan Yuโ€™s complete dismissal of women to get the Emperor to safety, to this scene where she literally uses a symbol of womanhood (within the movie at least) to disarm the villain of his symbol of masculinity and beat him at his own game, shows Mulan relying on the aspects of her femininity that she has grown up adhering to and adapting the tactical knowledge and fighting skills that she learned disguised as a male soldier to those aspects. The result is a unique and innovative view of the world and her course of action that leads her to save the day when the male soldiers failed and the women wouldnโ€™t even have been allowed to try.ย  This commentary is so curious to me because itโ€™s such an excellent example of white/western cultural bias in portrayals of other cultures. Because fans by themselves are a gender neutral object in Ancient China, especially the large type that Mulan uses in this particular scene is actually masculine if you must code it historically, and in Chinese hands would be used as a tool to support her masculinity and not the other way around. These paper fans are used in general by (male) scholars and artists who decorate its surface with art and calligraphy. It is a symbol of (masculine) intellectual power and the intellectual elite. And if you look to Asian martial arts films, they are a common and almost exclusive weapon of men. Yet the movie takes this deeply cultural object and either willingly or ignorantly makes it an object of womanhood or femininity. To the extent of my knowledge, this is mostly reflective of western social history. And draws from the coquettish ways Georgian? Ladies would use the fan to signal their romantic interest and all the history and influence around it. The equivalent object for the Chinese lady would in fact be the handkerchief, or a hairstick if you want something pointy. And itโ€™s all the more curious because at the end of the day itโ€™s a western depiction of a foreign story made for western consumption. It is not a story made by and for Chinese little girls, but to empower and inspire those in the West. Which provides the context for the above (excellent) analysis. It does not need to fully take Chinese history into context because it was never made for us, despite being explicitly about us.
Asian, Climbing, and College: ingu:
marrymejasonsegel:

I wrote a college paper once about gender dynamics in Disney films, and part dealt with the emphasis of androgyny in this film. Mulan is an outsider and unsure of her position of the world when she is adhering to both a total feminine role (the matchmaking scene) and a total masculine role (disguised as a male soldier) and itโ€™s only when sheโ€™s able to embrace both sides that she is able to fully showcase her abilities and ultimately save the day.ย 
The entire climax, from climbing the poles using sashes, counting on Shan Yuโ€™s complete dismissal of women to get the Emperor to safety, to this scene where she literally uses a symbol of womanhood (within the movie at least) to disarm the villain of his symbol of masculinity and beat him at his own game, shows Mulan relying on the aspects of her femininity that she has grown up adhering to and adapting the tactical knowledge and fighting skills that she learned disguised as a male soldier to those aspects. The result is a unique and innovative view of the world and her course of action that leads her to save the day when the male soldiers failed and the women wouldnโ€™t even have been allowed to try.ย 

This commentary is so curious to me because itโ€™s such an excellent example of white/western cultural bias in portrayals of other cultures. Because fans by themselves are a gender neutral object in Ancient China, especially the large type that Mulan uses in this particular scene is actually masculine if you must code it historically, and in Chinese hands would be used as a tool to support her masculinity and not the other way around. These paper fans are used in general by (male) scholars and artists who decorate its surface with art and calligraphy. It is a symbol of (masculine) intellectual power and the intellectual elite. And if you look to Asian martial arts films, they are a common and almost exclusive weapon of men.
Yet the movie takes this deeply cultural object and either willingly or ignorantly makes it an object of womanhood or femininity. To the extent of my knowledge, this is mostly reflective of western social history. And draws from the coquettish ways Georgian? Ladies would use the fan to signal their romantic interest and all the history and influence around it. The equivalent object for the Chinese lady would in fact be the handkerchief, or a hairstick if you want something pointy.
And itโ€™s all the more curious because at the end of the day itโ€™s a western depiction of a foreign story made for western consumption. It is not a story made by and for Chinese little girls, but to empower and inspire those in the West. Which provides the context for the above (excellent) analysis. It does not need to fully take Chinese history into context because it was never made for us, despite being explicitly about us.

ingu: marrymejasonsegel: I wrote a college paper once about gender dynamics in Disney films, and part dealt with the emphasis of androgyny ...

Asian, Climbing, and College: ingu: marrymejasonsegel: I wrote a college paper once about gender dynamics in Disney films, and part dealt with the emphasis of androgyny in this film. Mulan is an outsider and unsure of her position of the world when she is adhering to both a total feminine role (the matchmaking scene) and a total masculine role (disguised as a male soldier) and itโ€™s only when sheโ€™s able to embrace both sides that she is able to fully showcase her abilities and ultimately save the day.ย  The entire climax, from climbing the poles using sashes, counting on Shan Yuโ€™s complete dismissal of women to get the Emperor to safety, to this scene where she literally uses a symbol of womanhood (within the movie at least) to disarm the villain of his symbol of masculinity and beat him at his own game, shows Mulan relying on the aspects of her femininity that she has grown up adhering to and adapting the tactical knowledge and fighting skills that she learned disguised as a male soldier to those aspects. The result is a unique and innovative view of the world and her course of action that leads her to save the day when the male soldiers failed and the women wouldnโ€™t even have been allowed to try.ย  This commentary is so curious to me because itโ€™s such an excellent example of white/western cultural bias in portrayals of other cultures. Because fans by themselves are a gender neutral object in Ancient China, especially the large type that Mulan uses in this particular scene is actually masculine if you must code it historically, and in Chinese hands would be used as a tool to support her masculinity and not the other way around. These paper fans are used in general by (male) scholars and artists who decorate its surface with art and calligraphy. It is a symbol of (masculine) intellectual power and the intellectual elite. And if you look to Asian martial arts films, they are a common and almost exclusive weapon of men. Yet the movie takes this deeply cultural object and either willingly or ignorantly makes it an object of womanhood or femininity. To the extent of my knowledge, this is mostly reflective of western social history. And draws from the coquettish ways Georgian? Ladies would use the fan to signal their romantic interest and all the history and influence around it. The equivalent object for the Chinese lady would in fact be the handkerchief, or a hairstick if you want something pointy. And itโ€™s all the more curious because at the end of the day itโ€™s a western depiction of a foreign story made for western consumption. It is not a story made by and for Chinese little girls, but to empower and inspire those in the West. Which provides the context for the above (excellent) analysis. It does not need to fully take Chinese history into context because it was never made for us, despite being explicitly about us.
Asian, Climbing, and College: ingu:

marrymejasonsegel:

I wrote a college paper once about gender dynamics in Disney films, and part dealt with the emphasis of androgyny in this film. Mulan is an outsider and unsure of her position of the world when she is adhering to both a total feminine role (the matchmaking scene) and a total masculine role (disguised as a male soldier) and itโ€™s only when sheโ€™s able to embrace both sides that she is able to fully showcase her abilities and ultimately save the day.ย 
The entire climax, from climbing the poles using sashes, counting on Shan Yuโ€™s complete dismissal of women to get the Emperor to safety, to this scene where she literally uses a symbol of womanhood (within the movie at least) to disarm the villain of his symbol of masculinity and beat him at his own game, shows Mulan relying on the aspects of her femininity that she has grown up adhering to and adapting the tactical knowledge and fighting skills that she learned disguised as a male soldier to those aspects. The result is a unique and innovative view of the world and her course of action that leads her to save the day when the male soldiers failed and the women wouldnโ€™t even have been allowed to try.ย 

This commentary is so curious to me because itโ€™s such an excellent example of white/western cultural bias in portrayals of other cultures. Because fans by themselves are a gender neutral object in Ancient China, especially the large type that Mulan uses in this particular scene is actually masculine if you must code it historically, and in Chinese hands would be used as a tool to support her masculinity and not the other way around. These paper fans are used in general by (male) scholars and artists who decorate its surface with art and calligraphy. It is a symbol of (masculine) intellectual power and the intellectual elite. And if you look to Asian martial arts films, they are a common and almost exclusive weapon of men.
Yet the movie takes this deeply cultural object and either willingly or ignorantly makes it an object of womanhood or femininity. To the extent of my knowledge, this is mostly reflective of western social history. And draws from the coquettish ways Georgian? Ladies would use the fan to signal their romantic interest and all the history and influence around it. The equivalent object for the Chinese lady would in fact be the handkerchief, or a hairstick if you want something pointy.
And itโ€™s all the more curious because at the end of the day itโ€™s a western depiction of a foreign story made for western consumption. It is not a story made by and for Chinese little girls, but to empower and inspire those in the West. Which provides the context for the above (excellent) analysis. It does not need to fully take Chinese history into context because it was never made for us, despite being explicitly about us.

ingu: marrymejasonsegel: I wrote a college paper once about gender dynamics in Disney films, and part dealt with the emphasis of androgyny...

80s, 9gag, and Dumb: Name a yellow fruit. TOMIC Orange ATOMIC I feel that in the 80s, the purposely put dumb people on game shows๏ปฟ Follow @9gag - SGSA gameshow stress steveharvey
80s, 9gag, and Dumb: Name a yellow fruit.
 TOMIC
 Orange
 ATOMIC
I feel that in the 80s, the purposely put dumb people on game shows๏ปฟ Follow @9gag - SGSA gameshow stress steveharvey

I feel that in the 80s, the purposely put dumb people on game shows๏ปฟ Follow @9gag - SGSA gameshow stress steveharvey

Memes, Best, and Bible: LAD BIBLE Takeshi's Castle, one of the best game shows ever created is back for a new series over on Comedy Central UK ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ‘ ad
Memes, Best, and Bible: LAD
 BIBLE
Takeshi's Castle, one of the best game shows ever created is back for a new series over on Comedy Central UK ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ‘ ad

Takeshi's Castle, one of the best game shows ever created is back for a new series over on Comedy Central UK ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ‘ ad