But
But

But

And
And

And

Fuckboys
Fuckboys

Fuckboys

me-so-happy
me-so-happy

me-so-happy

never give up
 never give up

never give up

my favorite
 my favorite

my favorite

thoughts
 thoughts

thoughts

sitting out
 sitting out

sitting out

academically
academically

academically

favoritism
favoritism

favoritism

🔥 | Latest

Dyslexia: [OC] 1, 2, Dyslexia Boogaloo
Dyslexia: [OC] 1, 2, Dyslexia Boogaloo

[OC] 1, 2, Dyslexia Boogaloo

Dyslexia: In Case of "B" Break Glass My daughter is currently pulling a D- in math. This is her phone. galexion: handmetheshovel: thatguyinthecornerino: randomavengersquotes: lolnerdsposts: robanilla: justsomeonereloadable: thesecretkeith: blanketfortprincette: tastefullyoffensive: (photo by fistfullofcookies) Why do parents always assume their kid is lazy when they get bad grades? Like maybe help your kids by talking to them, not punishing them. This is how I failed math and didn’t even know I had number dyslexia for years. When my sister was in high school she struggled a LOT with math. Like I know a lot of people find it really difficult (myself included), but I mean she was really really bad at it. She has always been a very smart, creative and sensitive person, but math made no sense to her, to the point where passing seemed impossible. I will always remember that twice a week, around the kitchen table, my sister would sit down with my dad for hours, and they would try to work out her math homework. I should mention that my dad is an artist, and art teacher. Truth be told I think he struggled with math just as much if not more then she did. But twice a week you could hear them downstairs, going back and forth, trying to figure it out together. Some nights would be smooth and easy, some nights I could hear them arguing from one floor up about factors or equations, not in anger but in mutual frustration. I remember the day that she passed. My sister couldn’t wait until my dad’s school day ended, so she called him at work. She gleefully announced to him “I got a D-!”. We could hear him through the phone as he exclaimed “She got a D!” excitedly to his class. Still through the phone we heard his students clapping, laughing and whooping in congratulations. Seldom has a grade in our household been so celebrated. Just thought a shitty picture like this should be accompanied by a story about a person’s parents who actually gave a shit about helping their kid instead of mocking and punishing them. Read the story Read the story Read the story reblogging for the story. READ IT. THE STORY If it weren’t for my dad I would not be able to read and write. I was born1971 and people really didn’t know or care that some people struggle not because they are lazy but they just fuckin’ can’t do what comes easy to most. My dad did what that father did. Dad was working 12/14/16 hour days. And still… he sat down and read up on shit, talked to my teacher - and then he saved me. Reading has made me. I am a reader. The one thing people know about me is: she reads. Be like dad. Don’t be a tit. R E A DT h eS T O R Y
Dyslexia: In Case of "B"
 Break Glass
 My daughter is currently pulling a D- in math. This is her phone.
galexion:

handmetheshovel:
thatguyinthecornerino:

randomavengersquotes:

lolnerdsposts:

robanilla:


justsomeonereloadable:

thesecretkeith:

blanketfortprincette:

tastefullyoffensive:

(photo by fistfullofcookies)

Why do parents always assume their kid is lazy when they get bad grades? Like maybe help your kids by talking to them, not punishing them. This is how I failed math and didn’t even know I had number dyslexia for years.

When my sister was in high school she struggled a LOT with math. Like I know a lot of people find it really difficult (myself included), but I mean she was really really bad at it. She has always been a very smart, creative and sensitive person, but math made no sense to her, to the point where passing seemed impossible.
I will always remember that twice a week, around the kitchen table, my sister would sit down with my dad for hours, and they would try to work out her math homework. I should mention that my dad is an artist, and art teacher. Truth be told I think he struggled with math just as much if not more then she did. But twice a week you could hear them downstairs, going back and forth, trying to figure it out together. Some nights would be smooth and easy, some nights I could hear them arguing from one floor up about factors or equations, not in anger but in mutual frustration.
I remember the day that she passed. My sister couldn’t wait until my dad’s school day ended, so she called him at work. She gleefully announced to him “I got a D-!”. We could hear him through the phone as he exclaimed “She got a D!” excitedly to his class. Still through the phone we heard his students clapping, laughing and whooping in congratulations. Seldom has a grade in our household been so celebrated.
Just thought a shitty picture like this should be accompanied by a story about a person’s parents who actually gave a shit about helping their kid instead of mocking and punishing them.


Read the story


Read the story


Read the story 


reblogging for the story. READ IT.


THE STORY


If it weren’t for my dad I would not be able to read and write. I was born1971 and people really didn’t know or care that some people struggle not because they are lazy but they just fuckin’ can’t do what comes easy to most.
My dad did what that father did. 
Dad was working 12/14/16 hour days.
And still… he sat down and read up on shit, talked to my teacher - and then he saved me. Reading has made me. I am a reader. The one thing people know about me is: she reads.  
Be like dad.
Don’t be a tit.


R E A DT h eS T O R Y

galexion: handmetheshovel: thatguyinthecornerino: randomavengersquotes: lolnerdsposts: robanilla: justsomeonereloadable: thesecret...

Dyslexia: SESAME STREET.0 frislander: elfwreck: loreweaver: cameoappearance: derinthemadscientist: cameoappearance: spockglocksrocks: sometimes there’s videos that make me happy to exist on this planet i’d reblog this even if it was a still image I know it’s a sesame street clip but seriously, who is the target audience for this? Parents watching it with their kids, I guess? literally everyone Everyone. No, really… everyone. For adults, the appeal is Sir Patrick Stewart doing a kid’s educational bit in full Shakespearean dress and style; there’s a delightful cognitive dissonance between the very serious presentation and the very simple content. For very small children, it’s educational: this is the letter “B”; here’s how it’s shaped; here’s some words you know that start with it. Oh, and here’s a word you may not be familiar with that starts with it, so you can recognize that it’s the sound that matters, and not whatever other connection you made between the other two words. For older kids: you’ve probably heard that “to be or not to be?” speech, or at least part of it, so you can enjoy some of the parody the adults are watching. Also, here’s how to describe how a letter is made - how to teach young siblings who don’t read yet, how to explain both the shape and the sound. For kids with dyslexia: here’s how you differentiate a “B” from a P or D or E. You may have to go slowly and look carefully at the exact shapes that make up the whole, but there are differences and you can learn to recognize them.  For teens or young college students: In addition to whichever parts of those are relevant to you, here’s what Shakespearean acting sounds like. Here’s how to enunciate clearly and slowly, so your audience can understand terms they may not recognize and still follow the gist of what you’re saying. If you’re reading Shakespeare in school, try sounding it out like this and see if that helps it make sense. For new RenFaire workers: Here’s how to pronounce “zounds.”  One of the most glorious things in the world is Shakespearean actors doing stuff like this.
Dyslexia: SESAME STREET.0
frislander:
elfwreck:

loreweaver:

cameoappearance:

derinthemadscientist:

cameoappearance:

spockglocksrocks:

sometimes there’s videos that make me happy to exist on this planet

i’d reblog this even if it was a still image

I know it’s a sesame street clip but seriously, who is the target audience for this?

Parents watching it with their kids, I guess?

literally everyone

Everyone. No, really… everyone.
For adults, the appeal is Sir Patrick Stewart doing a kid’s educational bit in full Shakespearean dress and style; there’s a delightful cognitive dissonance between the very serious presentation and the very simple content.
For very small children, it’s educational: this is the letter “B”; here’s how it’s shaped; here’s some words you know that start with it. Oh, and here’s a word you may not be familiar with that starts with it, so you can recognize that it’s the sound that matters, and not whatever other connection you made between the other two words.
For older kids: you’ve probably heard that “to be or not to be?” speech, or at least part of it, so you can enjoy some of the parody the adults are watching. Also, here’s how to describe how a letter is made - how to teach young siblings who don’t read yet, how to explain both the shape and the sound.
For kids with dyslexia: here’s how you differentiate a “B” from a P or D or E. You may have to go slowly and look carefully at the exact shapes that make up the whole, but there are differences and you can learn to recognize them. 
For teens or young college students: In addition to whichever parts of those are relevant to you, here’s what Shakespearean acting sounds like. Here’s how to enunciate clearly and slowly, so your audience can understand terms they may not recognize and still follow the gist of what you’re saying. If you’re reading Shakespeare in school, try sounding it out like this and see if that helps it make sense.
For new RenFaire workers: Here’s how to pronounce “zounds.” 

One of the most glorious things in the world is Shakespearean actors doing stuff like this.

frislander: elfwreck: loreweaver: cameoappearance: derinthemadscientist: cameoappearance: spockglocksrocks: sometimes there’s video...

Dyslexia: Dysexlia A fnerid who has disexiya diseebcrd to me how she epicrexnees radenig. She can read, but it tekas a lot of ctnaooicenrtn, and the Irteets semes to imup aonurd" Immeeeerbd riandeg aubot tmoiglcepyya. Wdouln't it be pbslsioe to do it ineeilvctrtay on a wbsetie wtih Jpviasrcat? Srue it wuold. Pbisehlud 03 March 2106 Tags disxyeia Feel like mnkiag a bemroolakkt of this or smotienhg? Fork it on guhitb. tiepgylmocya Dxeilsya is cretciaaehzrd by dtificlufy with laneirng to raed flunety and with arcaucte csoermoniphen dpeitse naorml ienceglintle. This incdules difictiufy with paoholncgoil aewasnres, piciooongahl deicodng, pesnocirsg seepd, ohohragpirtc codnig, aiorutdy sroht-term mreomy, Igangaue slkis/vbreal cohpnmseieron, and/or raipd ninmag. Jvaariscpt Dmoeneeatipvl niedag ddsroier (DRD) is the msot comomn linnaerg diailistby. Delxsyia is the msot regocieznd of ridnaeg drerosdis, hwoeevr not all ndiaeg dsierrdos are kiend to dxselyia Some see diyslexa as dincstit form rndaeig dcufilifeits rtinuseig form ohter caesus, such as a non-nocuragielol dcfcenieiy with vsioin or hraenig, or poor or iudqtaanee reinadg iuiosttrcnn. Three are three perosopd ctoingive sytbpues of dsxyiela (atirudoy, vasiul and antantteio), althoguh ianidvduil cases of dxsileya are betetr epenalixd by spficeic uyinidenrg ngerycpiosuhoaclol dcifites and co-oncriucrg Iriennag dbilitsieas (e.g. aotitnten-deifcit/hveytctiraipy dedsrior, mtah dsabltiy, etc.). Augholth it is cidrenseod to be a ricvteepe gnaauge-based lenianrg dbisilaity in the rseecarh lituraete, dsylixea also actfes one's exivpssree laagnuge slkis. Rsehcreears at MIT fnuod taht polpee with dixiesya eixthiebd imrpeaid vocie-ritinogecon atibleis. Scruoe: Wipkidiea aquilacalvitium: cameoamalthea: pinkjacuzzi: micdotcom: This is what it’s like to have dyslexia. Web developer Victor Widell is hoping to shine a light on the learning disorder with this creative coding simulation. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This is what it looks like for me !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So accurate !!!!!! This! It can be so hard for people to get it. I’ve been told “you can’t have a disability” because I did well in school or because I have a law degree, because I scored high on the LSAT (which was despite not being able to finish it). Learning disabilities don’t = stupid, it’s just slower and more difficult to read/spell. Oh wow I think every single person without dyslexia should see this
Dyslexia: Dysexlia
 A fnerid who has disexiya diseebcrd to me how she epicrexnees radenig. She can read, but it tekas a lot of
 ctnaooicenrtn, and the Irteets semes to imup aonurd"
 Immeeeerbd riandeg aubot tmoiglcepyya. Wdouln't it be pbslsioe to do it ineeilvctrtay on a wbsetie wtih
 Jpviasrcat? Srue it wuold.
 Pbisehlud
 03 March 2106
 Tags
 disxyeia
 Feel like mnkiag a bemroolakkt of this or smotienhg? Fork it on guhitb.
 tiepgylmocya
 Dxeilsya is cretciaaehzrd by dtificlufy with laneirng to raed flunety and with arcaucte
 csoermoniphen dpeitse naorml ienceglintle. This incdules difictiufy with paoholncgoil
 aewasnres, piciooongahl deicodng, pesnocirsg seepd, ohohragpirtc codnig, aiorutdy
 sroht-term mreomy, Igangaue slkis/vbreal cohpnmseieron, and/or raipd ninmag.
 Jvaariscpt
 Dmoeneeatipvl niedag ddsroier (DRD) is the msot comomn linnaerg diailistby. Delxsyia
 is the msot regocieznd of ridnaeg drerosdis, hwoeevr not all ndiaeg dsierrdos are
 kiend to dxselyia
 Some see diyslexa as dincstit form rndaeig dcufilifeits rtinuseig form ohter caesus, such
 as a non-nocuragielol dcfcenieiy with vsioin or hraenig, or poor or iudqtaanee reinadg
 iuiosttrcnn. Three are three perosopd ctoingive sytbpues of dsxyiela (atirudoy, vasiul
 and antantteio), althoguh ianidvduil cases of dxsileya are betetr epenalixd by spficeic
 uyinidenrg ngerycpiosuhoaclol dcifites and co-oncriucrg Iriennag dbilitsieas (e.g.
 aotitnten-deifcit/hveytctiraipy dedsrior, mtah dsabltiy, etc.). Augholth it is cidrenseod to
 be a ricvteepe gnaauge-based lenianrg dbisilaity in the rseecarh lituraete, dsylixea also
 actfes one's exivpssree laagnuge slkis. Rsehcreears at MIT fnuod taht polpee with
 dixiesya eixthiebd imrpeaid vocie-ritinogecon atibleis.
 Scruoe: Wipkidiea
aquilacalvitium:
cameoamalthea:

pinkjacuzzi:

micdotcom:

This is what it’s like to have dyslexia. Web developer Victor Widell is hoping to shine a light on the learning disorder with this creative coding simulation.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This is what it looks like for me !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So accurate !!!!!!

This! It can be so hard for people to get it. I’ve been told “you can’t have a disability” because I did well in school or because I have a law degree, because I scored high on the LSAT (which was despite not being able to finish it). Learning disabilities don’t = stupid, it’s just slower and more difficult to read/spell.


Oh wow
I think every single person without dyslexia should see this

aquilacalvitium: cameoamalthea: pinkjacuzzi: micdotcom: This is what it’s like to have dyslexia. Web developer Victor Widell is hoping...